UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington D. C. 20549

  

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

 

x

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended September 30, 2015

 

 

¨

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

 

For the transition period from _____________ to _____________

 

Commission File Number: 000-54329

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada

98-0583166

(State or Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization)

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

8561 East Anderson Drive, Suite 104

Scottsdale, AZ 85225
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

 

(480) 478-6660
(Registrant's telephone number)

 

________________________________________________________________

(Former Name, Former Address and Former Fiscal Year, if changed since last report)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act:

 

Title of Each Class

to be so Registered:

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

None

 

None

 

Securities registered under Section 12(g) of the Act: Common Stock, par value $0.00001 per share

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o No x

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o No x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the "Exchange Act") during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes x No ¨

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer

¨

Accelerated filer

¨

Non-accelerated filer

¨

Smaller reporting company

x

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o No x

 

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates was $42,920,445 computed by reference to the closing price of the common stock on March 31, 2015. For purposes of the above statement only, all directors, executive officers and 10% stockholders are assumed to be affiliates. This determination of affiliate status is not necessarily a conclusive determination for any other purpose.

 

The number of outstanding shares of the Registrant's common stock, par value $0.00001 per share, at January 13, 2016 was 98,309,743.

 

 


AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.

 

FORM 10-K

INDEX

 

 

 

Page

 

PART I

 

ITEM 1.

Business

 

 

4

 

ITEM 1A.

Risk Factors

 

 

12

 

ITEM 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

 

32

 

ITEM 2.

Properties

 

 

32

 

ITEM 3.

Legal Proceedings

 

 

32

 

ITEM 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

 

 

32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PART II

 

ITEM 5.

Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

 

33

 

ITEM 6.

Selected Financial Data

 

 

33

 

ITEM 7.

Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

 

33

 

ITEM 7A

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure About Market Risk

 

 

39

 

ITEM 8.

Financial Statements and Supplemental Data

 

 

39

 

ITEM 9.

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

 

39

 

ITEM 9A.

Controls and Procedures

 

 

40

 

ITEM 9B.

Other Information

 

 

41

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PART III

 

ITEM 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

 

42

 

ITEM 11.

Executive Compensation

 

 

46

 

ITEM 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

 

47

 

ITEM 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

 

47

 

ITEM 14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

 

 

48

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PART IV

 

ITEM 15.

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

 

48

 

SIGNATURES

 

 

 50

 

 

 
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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

Statements in this annual report may be "forward-looking statements." Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements that express our intentions, beliefs, expectations, strategies, predictions or any other statements relating to our future activities or other future events or conditions. These statements are based on current expectations, estimates and projections about our business based, in part, on assumptions made by management. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions that are difficult to predict. Therefore, actual outcomes and results may, and are likely to, differ materially from what is expressed or forecasted in the forward-looking statements due to numerous factors, including those described above and those risks discussed from time to time in this prospectus, including the risks described under "Risk Factors," and "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in this annual report and in other documents which we file with the Securities and Exchange Commission. In addition, such statements could be affected by risks and uncertainties related to our ability to raise any financing which we may require for our operations, competition, government regulations and requirements, pricing and development difficulties, our ability to make acquisitions and successfully integrate those acquisitions with our business, as well as general industry and market conditions and growth rates, and general economic conditions. Any forward-looking statements speak only as of the date on which they are made, and we do not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date of the filing of this annual report, except as may be required under applicable securities laws.

 

 
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PART I

 

We urge you to read this entire Annual Report on Form 10-K, including the "Risk Factors" section and the financial statements and related notes included herein. As used in this Annual Report, unless context otherwise requires, the words "we," "us", "our," "the Company," "Avant" and "Registrant" refer to Avant Diagnostics, Inc, including subsidiaries and predecessors, except where it is clear that the term refers to Avant Diagnostics, Inc.. Also, any reference to "common shares," or "common stock," refers to our common stock, par value $0.00001 per share.

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS.

 

Corporate History and Structure

 

The Company was incorporated on October 16, 2008 in the State of Nevada as "Oreon Rental Corporation". At the time of its incorporation, the management of the Company intended to operate electronics rental stores in Ternopil and other similar cities throughout Ukraine. However, at the time of its incorporation and its initial public offering of common stock in October 2008, the Company did not own any such stores, nor did it have any ongoing business operations. The Company underwent a change in management in January 2010. Following the change in management, the Company decided not to proceed with its original plan of operations and to shift its business focus to that of an independent oil and gas company engaged in the acquisition, drilling and production of oil and natural gas properties and prospects. During 2014, the Company wound down its oil and natural gas operations and decided to complete a reverse recapitalization with Avant Diagnostics, Inc., a Nevada Corporation established in 2009.

 

Acquisition of Avant Diagnostics, Inc.

 

Effective December 29, 2014, the Company completed a reverse recapitalization, as agreed in the definitive Agreement and Plan of Reorganization, of 100% of the outstanding equity interests of American Liberty Petroleum Corp. ("ALP"). Avant stockholders received 74,354,139 shares of common stock for a 93% equity interest in ALP. Such share exchange was calculated based on a one-for-one conversion ratio after a 1 for 17 reverse stock split of ALP which was subsequently effected in March 2015. The split affected the ALP common stock and not the Avant common stock. All references in the accompanying consolidated financial statements to the number of shares, options and other common stock equivalents, price per share and weighted-average number of shares outstanding of common stock have been adjusted to retroactively reflect the effect of the reverse stock split. Per the terms of the Agreement and Plan of Reorganization, ALP was delivered with zero assets and $70,000 in liabilities at time of closing. Following the reverse merger, we changed the name of ALP to "Avant Diagnostics, Inc." The transaction was regarded as a reverse recapitalization whereby Avant was considered to be the accounting acquirer as it retained control of ALP after the exchange. Although ALP is the legal parent company, the share exchange was treated as a recapitalization of ALP. Avant is the continuing entity for financial reporting purposes. Accordingly, the assets and liabilities and the historical operations reflected in the financial statements are those of Avant for all periods presented.

 

As of September 30, 2015, there remained a total of 3,510,000 shares of common stock that still had not been converted by Avant stockholders as part of the reverse recapitalization. The Agreement and Plan of Reorganization does not provide for cash in lieu of exchange of shares and provides that upon the merger, the stockholders acquired their rights in ALP shares and all outstanding shares of Avant were deemed to be cancelled. There is no timeframe as to when the stockholders must convert their shares and, as of the date of this report, the shares have not been issued.

 

Marketing and Pricing

 

The Company currently has no revenue or revenue producing assets.

 

Market Opportunity

 

According to a study by conducted by Quest Diagnostics, the largest clinical testing laboratory in the U.S., the laboratory testing market in the United States is approximately $50 billion market that is 60% controlled by testing performed by hospital-based laboratories. The remaining portion of this market is divided between independent clinical laboratories (35%) and physician office laboratories (POLs) that perform 5% of overall testing. Within the independent clinical laboratory segment, Quest Diagnostics and LabCorp are the two largest national reference labs and control approximately $12.5 billion of this $17.5 billion market segment. The remaining $5 billion is controlled by other national laboratories and smaller independent regional laboratories. Within this $50 billion market, most of the testing that is performed is for routine lab tests and anatomic pathology tests and services. However, recently there has been a dramatic increase in gene-based and esoteric testing. Esoteric tests include procedures in the areas of molecular diagnostics, protein chemistry, cellular immunology, and advanced microbiology. Commonly ordered esoteric tests include viral and bacterial detection tests, drug therapy monitoring tests, autoimmune panels, and complex cancer evaluations.

 

 
4
 

 

The growth of these specialized tests has been made possible through new molecular diagnostic technologies that make it possible to detect diseases earlier, utilize genetic testing for disease predisposition, and advance the use of personalized medicine, such as the tailoring of cancer therapies to those individuals most likely to respond. Esoteric tests typically require highly-skilled technical personnel and generally require more sophisticated technology, equipment or materials. As a result, esoteric tests are generally reimbursed at higher levels than routine tests. This increase in specialized testing is evidenced by the shift in Quest Diagnostics' esoteric testing revenues from less than 10% of total revenues to their current level of 20% over the past 9 years. In the case of LabCorp, the second largest clinical testing laboratory in the country, in 2009 esoteric testing accounted for 36% of their annual consolidated revenue, which they expect to grow to 40% within three to five years. In addition to Quest Diagnostics and LabCorp, there are approximately 60 commercial laboratories that control the independent clinical laboratory market segment in the United States. There are also approximately 300 genetic testing laboratories in the U.S., with 80% of them affiliated with academic institutions. As a result of these new trends, molecular diagnostic testing that supports personalized medicine is now the fastest growing segment within the overall laboratory testing market.

 

In addition to the laboratory testing market, there is another market that is comprised of diagnostic instrumentation and test kits that are marketed for the purpose of performing diagnostic testing on human samples, which normally uses blood, urine, or other body fluid specimens. This market is referred to as the in vitro diagnostic (IVD) market and literally means "within the glass", as in a test tube. A test that is performedin vitro is one that is done in glass or plastic vessels in the laboratory as opposed toin vivo, which is performed in a living organism. This combination of instrumentation and test kits is generally sold to reference laboratories, hospital clinical laboratories, state and national health testing facilities, and other laboratories that in turn perform the laboratory tests and provide results to physicians and their patients. According to a report published by PricewaterhouseCoopers titled "Diagnostics 2009", the worldwide IVD market was $37 billion in 2007 and is expected to grow by 5% per annum to $50 billion in 2012. According to market research by Kalorama Information, the U.S. IVD market is the single largest diagnostics market in the world and represents 43% of the global IVD market. The largest IVD companies in the world are Roche, Abbott, Siemens, Johnson & Johnson (Ortho), Beckman Coulter, bioMérieux, Inverness Medical, Bio-Rad, Sysmex, and Becton Dickenson. All of these 10 companies have IVD sales exceeding $1 billion and collectively they represent approximately 85% of the total worldwide IVD market. The fastest growing segment within the IVD market is molecular diagnostics, which is expected to grow by 14% per annum and reach $5 billion in 2012. In the context of this PricewaterhouseCoopers market report, molecular diagnostics includes only those tests that analyze the DNA or RNA of an organism. However, molecular diagnostics is more often widely defined to include tests that analyze other types of molecules as well. In their report, PricewaterhouseCoopers goes on to state that besides the dramatic increase in molecular diagnostics, some of the biggest changes within the diagnostics industry will be the increased use of:

 

·

Early diagnostics: Diagnostic products permitting the detection of a disease at very early stages of its development thus giving more treatment options (e.g. early ovarian and lung cancer detection allowing surgery);

 

 

 

·

Prognostics: Diagnostics that provide a prediction or estimate the risk of developing a particular condition based onphenotypic (e.g. transcriptomic, proteomic or metabolomic) parameters; or genomic (e.g. hereditary or gene based) characteristics;

 

 

 

·

Companion diagnostics: Diagnostic products to evaluate an individual patient's likelihood of benefiting from a particular therapeutic or risk of suffering certain adverse events from a particular therapeutic. Companion diagnostics represent a greater integration between diagnostics and therapeutics;

 

 

 

·

Screening tests: Diagnostics performed on people prior to a clinical manifestation of disease - this contrasts with most other medical checks, which are performed when symptoms are already available. Screening typically involves testing a target population for a particular condition as part of a public health strategy;

 

 

 

·

Pharmacogenomic tests: Examine the influence of genetic variation on drug response in patients by correlating gene expression or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with a drug's efficacy or toxicity. The aim of pharmacogenomics isto take into account a patient's genotype to optimize drug therapy, i.e. to maximize efficacy while minimizing adverse effects.

 

There are a number of key trends that are having a significant impact on the clinical testing business and represent opportunities for companies that can develop novel diagnostic tests. Clinical laboratory testing is an essential healthcare service and is being favorably impacted by the following:

 

·

Demographics: The growing and aging population is increasing the demand for clinical testing;

 

 

 

·

Increased testing: Physicians are increasingly relying on diagnostic testing to help identify disease risk, detect the symptoms of disease earlier, aid in the choice of therapeutic regimen, and monitor patient compliance and to evaluate treatment results;

 

 

 

·

Advances in science and technology: Recent medical advances have allowed earlier diagnosis and treatment of diseases and continuing research and development in the area of genomics is expected to yield new, more sophisticated and specialized diagnostic tests. These advances also are spurring interest in, and demand for, personalized or tailored medicine;

 

 

 

·

Prevention and wellness: There is an increased awareness of the benefits of preventative medicine and wellness. Consumers, employers, health plans, and government agencies are increasingly focusing on detecting diseases earlier and providing preventative care that helps avoid disease.

 

 
5
 

 

As a result of these significant changes in the laboratory testing and IVD markets, it is evident that there is a significant commercial opportunity for companies that provide products or services that address the new needs of the evolving diagnostics marketplace. This is the market opportunity that the Company is addressing through its introduction of diagnostics tests that use patented, patent-pending, and proprietary technology to improve health and reduce the overall cost of healthcare through early detection, prevention, and treatment.

 

Our Strategy

 

The Company's solution is to utilize the technology that it has exclusively licensed from Wayne State University to exploit the new opportunities that are evolving in the diagnostics industry. The Company was created to specifically commercialize microarray-based diagnostic tests and services that are focused on early detection and pre-symptomatic screening. These new tests are based on patented and proprietary technology that is well-suited to be run in a central or regional laboratory utilizing samples that are collected by healthcare providers and sent to the authorized CLIA/ISO-certified testing facility for processing. This approach is similar to the business model that Myriad Genetics, Inc. (Revenues: $470.45 million; market cap: $1.98 billion; NASDAQ:MYGN) has utilized with the seven tests that it markets that determine predisposition to hereditary breast cancer, ovarian cancer, colon cancer, endometrial cancer and melanoma skin cancer. However, whereas Myriad Genetics determines a predisposition to a particular disease, the Company will market diagnostic tests that can be used to screen for the actual disease itself, in most cases before any symptoms have been observed. To achieve this goal of commercializing new diagnostic opportunities, the Company is leveraging off the strategic relationships that have been established with organizations such as Wayne State University and others to develop unique and high value-added diagnostic tests.

 

Although the initial focus of the Company is the OvaDxÒ test, the Company will explore opportunities for other microarray-based diagnostic tests, which may include pre-symptomatic screening tests for Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, prostate cancer, and other applications that allow early detection. The Company will also explore companion diagnostic opportunities for pharmaceuticals such as PlavixÒ, the world's leading anti-clotting medication that is manufactured by Bristol-Myers Squibb in conjunction with Sanofi-Aventis Pharmaceuticals. With the completion of the human genome sequencing project, genetic research has increased its focus on identifying the variations of the specific genes in the genome. These variations are what define individual characteristics, including disease states or a statistical propensity for disease. The implications are far-reaching and impact not only the research community, but also individual patients and medical providers. Diagnostic tests that detect diseases very early in their progression will provide options for earlier treatments that may improve the patient's quality of life and prognosis by delaying or preventing disease progression or even death. Medical providers will incur major cost savings by avoiding costly late stage disease treatments.

 

License Agreements

 

As a result of a Technology Transfer Agreement dated July 18, 2009, between Avant Diagnostics, Inc. and Arriyat Corporation ("Arriyat"), Avant has exclusive license rights to all of the trade secrets and protocols required for the sale and use of the OvaDx Ò ovarian cancer test. In addition, as a result of a technology transfer agreement with a stockholder of Avant, we will benefit from an extensive microarray technology patent portfolio and expertise, which includes the following:

 

·

Patented microarray printing technology: Arrayit's patented (U.S. Patent 6,101,946) microarray printing technology is differentiated from other techniques in the market because other companies are limited by what they can deposit on a microarray; specifically DNA. The Arrayit technology can deposit any kind of molecule on a microarray, including DNA, proteins, antibodies, patient samples, diagnostic elements, and other compounds. This unique technology gives the Company a competitive advantage in the types of future diagnostic products that it develops and commercializes, as well as freedom to operate in the microarray manufacturing marketplace.

 

 

 

·

Patented VIP technology: Arrayit's patented microarray diagnostic Variation Identification Platform (VIP) technology has the ability to test 10, 100, 1,000, 10,000, and up to 100,000 patients on a single microscope substrate slide requiring only one assay to match 100,000 patients to a particular disease state. Should any one of those 10 to100,000 patient samples contain the marker for the disease being tested it would produce a red spot; if no disease, a green spot. This procedure also identifies carriers as yellow spots. Because of the sophistication of this patent, one lab could test hundreds of thousands of patient samples a day after receiving a sample of DNA from each patient. VIP is the only method available to the industry that can accomplish this. This is a revolutionary improvement by saving time and money, laboratory space, personnel, equipment, chemicals, reagents and consumables. It also positions the Company uniquely. As microarray diagnostics continue to gain acceptance in healthcare, the need to screen thousands of patients a day will make any competitor's one patient per slide per experiment methodology far too costly and time consuming. Even when testing just 10 patients, the patented VIP method has impressive 10-fold decrease in time and cost over methods that use one microarray per test. VIP technology is especially attractive for population-wide diagnostic screening applications, such as the H1N1 virus and other infectious diseases. VIP technology is also extremely useful in limited-population screening as companion diagnostics for drugs such as Plavix Ò. Plavix Ò patients that have the CYP2C19 gene variant respond poorly to Plavix Òtreatment and a VIP test to screen Plavix Ò patients would improve drug efficacy by targeting the correct segment of the population that can benefit from this drug. Avant's multi-patient genotyping procedure is protected by the following patents:

 

 
6
 

 

·

U.S. Patent 6,913,879

Australia 2002218740

Europe 1343911

Korea 10-0756015

New Zealand 523560

Singapore 94899

Taiwan I280282

Israel 153848

People's Republic of China L01813972.8

 

·

Microarray expertise: The future success of the Company is made possible by leveraging off the ability to continually innovate and develop sophisticated microarray based diagnostic products. The Company relies on the identification of biomarkers and the ability to commercialize them by utilizing Arrayit's delivery technology. The Company is seizing the opportunities created by Arrayit's advanced technologies that are driving the discovery of unique biomarkers in laboratories around the globe. The microarrays manufactured by Arrayit and utilized in the Company's tests are considered to be the best in the industry and are 99% pure (versus 70% for competitors) and are the most sensitive on the market.

 

 

 

·

Growing menu of screening tests: The Company's OvaDxÒ ovarian cancer test will set the standard for early detection and pre-symptomatic screening utilizing a microarray based diagnostic test. We expect to expand this menu of tests to provide other early detection tests for key diseases where adequate diagnostic screening tests do not exist and where early detection can save lives and improve quality of life, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, prostate cancer, and other diseases and medical conditions. We expect that other cancer tests, neurological assays, and areas such as allergy and food intolerance testing will benefit from the efficient patient screening model that are utilized in our tests. Additional markets for consideration that will also benefit from screening tests using our licensed technology are blood typing, parentage testing, forensics, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) analysis, infectious disease diagnosis, food testing, crop testing, and anti-terrorism  analysis.

 

 

 

·

Ability to leverage strategic relationships: We expect that the relationships that have been established with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Sandia Laboratories, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, The Parkinson's Institute, MIT, Stanford University, the NIH, and other prestigious institutions, organizations, and companies around the world will benefit us immensely as we strive to create a world-class diagnostic testing company. We believe that our relationships will allow us to license biomarkers discoveries from these and other research facilities that have the potential to create innovative diagnostic tests. Similar to our relationship with Wayne State University, and the worldwide exclusive licensing and sponsored research agreements that we put in place with them, we believe additional novel diagnostic tests can be developed based on licensing of biomarkers discovered by our academic and scientific collaborators.

 

Upon completion of 510K trials for ovarian cancer diagnostic monitoring, management believes Avant's OvaDxÒ test should have a competitive advantage over Roche's CA-125 test and Vermillion's Ova 1 test. 

 

The Company has no current operations and so does not experience direct competition from other businesses. The Company intends to operate in the medical diagnostics marketplace.

 

Competition is intense in existing and potential diagnostic markets. Our competitors in the United States and abroad are numerous and include, other molecular diagnostic companies, diagnostic reference laboratories, large multi-national healthcare companies, and universities and other research institutions. For instance, some laboratories provide a test intended to predict the cancer's aggressiveness among patients with prostate cancer and other laboratories provide hereditary cancer testing for melanoma, breast, ovarian, colorectal and uterine cancer. Some of our potential competitors have considerably greater financial, technical, marketing and other resources than we do. We expect competition to intensify in our current fields as technical advances occur and become more widely known. We anticipate that others may also launch their own molecular diagnostic tests which may compete with our testing products and services.

 

The technologies for discovering the underlying cause of major diseases, patients' response to therapies, and disease progression, as well as the approaches for commercializing those discoveries are rapidly evolving. Rapid technological developments could result in our potential tests or processes becoming obsolete before we recover a significant portion of our related research and development costs and associated capital expenditures. If we do not discover biomarkers, develop molecular diagnostic tests and related information services based on such discoveries, obtain regulatory and other approvals, and launch such services before our competitors, we could be adversely affected. Moreover, any molecular diagnostic tests that we may develop could be made obsolete by less expensive or more effective tests or methods that may be developed in the future.

 

 
7
 

 

The Company's success will depend on its ability to retain its key manager, controller and recruit additional employees.

 

The Company will rely heavily on one knowledgeable and highly-skilled full-time employee manager, who is currently the President and Chief Executive Officer of Avant. This key employee could leave Avant and so deprive Avant of the skill and knowledge essential for performance of its existing and new businesses. If Avant's key employee leaves for any reason(s), it could harm Avant's operating results and financial condition. Additionally, Avant cannot assure its investors that the company will be able to offer prospective managers and other key employees' competitive opportunities with the compensation and benefits packages necessary to attract talented and experienced people to fill key management, professional and technical positions.

 

Governmental Regulation

 

The services that we provide are regulated by federal, state and foreign governmental authorities. Failure to comply with the applicable laws and regulations can subject us to repayment of amounts previously paid to us, significant civil and criminal penalties, loss of licensure, certification, or accreditation, or exclusion from government health care programs. The significant areas of regulation are summarized below.

 

Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 and State Regulation

 

Each of our clinical laboratories must hold certain federal, state and local licenses, certifications and permits to conduct our business. Laboratories in the United States that perform testing on human specimens for the purpose of providing information for the diagnosis, prevention, or treatment of disease are subject to the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988, or ("CLIA"). CLIA requires such laboratories to be certified by the federal government and mandates compliance with various operational, personnel, facilities administration, quality and proficiency testing requirements intended to ensure that testing services are accurate, reliable and timely. CLIA certification also is a prerequisite to be eligible to bill state and federal health care programs, as well as many private insurers, for laboratory testing services. Our laboratories in Salt Lake City, Utah, Austin, Texas and South San Francisco, California are CLIA certified to perform high complexity tests.

 

In addition, CLIA requires our certified laboratories to enroll in an approved proficiency testing program if it performs testing in any category for which proficiency testing is required. Our laboratories periodically test specimens received from an outside proficiency testing organization and then submit the results back to that organization for evaluation. If our laboratories fails to achieve a passing score on a proficiency test they lose their right to perform testing. Further, failure to comply with other proficiency testing regulations, such as the prohibition on referral of a proficiency testing specimen to another laboratory for analysis, can result in revocation of our laboratories' CLIA certification.

 

As a condition of CLIA certification, each of our laboratories is subject to survey and inspection every other year, in addition to being subject to additional random inspections. The biennial survey is conducted by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services ("CMS"), a CMS agent (typically a state agency), or, a CMS-approved accreditation organization. Our laboratories are accredited by the College of American Pathologists ("CAP"), which is a CMS-approved accreditation organization.

 

CLIA provides that a state may adopt laboratory regulations that are more stringent than those under federal law. Our laboratories are licensed by the appropriate state agencies in the states in which they operate, if such licensure is required. In addition, our laboratories hold state licenses from California, Florida, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Maryland, to the extent that they accept specimens from one or more of these states, each of which require out-of-state laboratories to obtain licensure. If a laboratory is out of compliance with state laws or regulations governing licensed laboratories, penalties for violation vary from state to state but may include suspension, limitation, revocation or annulment of the license, assessment of financial penalties or fines, or imprisonment. We believe that we are in material compliance with all applicable licensing laws and regulations.

 

Food and Drug Administration

 

Although the Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") has consistently claimed that it has the authority to regulate laboratory-developed tests ("LDTs") that are developed, validated and performed only by a CLIA certified laboratory, it has historically exercised enforcement discretion by not otherwise regulating most LDTs. Nevertheless, the FDA recently indicated that it is promulgating draft guidance for FDA regulation of most LDTs in the future.

 

After a medical device is placed on the market, numerous regulatory requirements apply. These include:

 

·

compliance with the QSR, which require manufacturers to follow stringent design, testing, control, documentation, record maintenance, including maintenance of complaint and related investigation files, and other quality assurance controls during the manufacturing process;

 

·

labeling regulations, which prohibit the promotion of products for uncleared, unapproved or "off-label" uses and impose other restrictions on labeling; and

 

·

medical device reporting obligations, which require that manufacturers investigate and report to the FDA adverse events, including deaths, or serious injuries that may have been or were caused by a medical device and malfunctions in the device that would likely cause or contribute to a death or serious injury if it were to recur.

 

 
8
 

 

Failure to comply with applicable regulatory requirements can result in enforcement action by the FDA, which may include sanctions, including but not limited to, warning letters; fines, injunctions, and civil penalties; recall or seizure of the device; operating restrictions, partial suspension or total shutdown of production; refusal to grant 510(k) clearance or PMA approvals of new devices; withdrawal of 510(k) clearance or PMA approvals; and civil or criminal prosecution. To ensure compliance with regulatory requirements, medical device manufacturers are subject to market surveillance and periodic, pre-scheduled and unannounced inspections by the FDA.

 

HIPAA and other privacy laws

 

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 ("HIPAA"), established comprehensive federal protection for the privacy and security of health information. The HIPAA standards apply to three types of organizations: health plans, healthcare clearing houses, and healthcare providers which conduct certain healthcare transactions electronically ("Covered Entities"). Title II of HIPAA, the Administrative Simplification Act, contains provisions that address the privacy of health data, the security of health data, the standardization of identifying numbers used in the healthcare system and the standardization of certain healthcare transactions. The privacy regulations protect medical records and other protected health information by limiting their use and release, giving patients the right to access their medical records and limiting most disclosures of health information to the minimum amount necessary to accomplish an intended purpose. The HIPAA security standards require the adoption of administrative, physical, and technical safeguards and the adoption of written security policies and procedures.

 

On February 17, 2009, Congress enacted Subtitle D of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act, or HITECH, provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. HITECH amends HIPAA and, among other things, expands and strengthens HIPAA, creates new targets for enforcement, imposes new penalties for noncompliance and establishes new breach notification requirements for Covered Entities. Regulations implementing major provisions of HITECH were finalized on January 25, 2013 through publication of the HIPAA Omnibus Rule (the "Omnibus Rule").

 

Under HITECH's new breach notification requirements, Covered Entities must report breaches of protected health information that has not been encrypted or otherwise secured in accordance with guidance from the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (the "Secretary"). Required breach notices must be made as soon as is reasonably practicable, but no later than 60 days following discovery of the breach. Reports must be made to affected individuals and to the Secretary and in some cases, they must be reported through local and national media, depending on the size of the breach. Breach reports can lead to investigation and enforcement.

 

We are currently subject to the HIPAA regulations and maintain an active compliance program that is designed to identify security incidents and other issues in a timely fashion and enable us to remediate, mitigate harm or report if required by law. We are subject to prosecution and/or administrative enforcement and increased civil and criminal penalties for non-compliance, including a new, four-tiered system of monetary penalties adopted under HITECH. We are also subject to enforcement by state attorneys general who were given authority to enforce HIPAA under HITECH. To avoid penalties under the HITECH breach notification provisions, we must ensure that breaches of protected health information are promptly detected and reported within the company, so that we can make all required notifications on a timely basis. However, even if we make required reports on a timely basis, we may still be subject to penalties for the underlying breach.

 

In addition to the federal privacy regulations, there are a number of state laws regarding the privacy and security of health information and personal data that are applicable to our clinical laboratories. Many states have also implemented genetic testing and privacy laws imposing specific patient consent requirements and protecting test results by strictly limiting the disclosure of those results. State requirements are particularly stringent regarding predictive genetic tests, due to the risk of genetic discrimination against healthy patients identified through testing as being at a high risk for disease. We believe that we have taken the steps required of us to comply with health information privacy and security statutes and regulations, including genetic testing and genetic information privacy laws in all jurisdictions, both state and federal. However, we may not be able to maintain compliance in all jurisdictions where we do business. Failure to maintain compliance, or changes in state or federal laws regarding privacy or security, could result in civil and/or criminal penalties and could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

We are subject to laws and regulations related to the protection of the environment, the health and safety of employees and the handling, transportation and disposal of medical specimens, infectious and hazardous waste and radioactive materials. For example, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration ("OSHA"), has established extensive requirements relating specifically to workplace safety for healthcare employers in the U.S. This includes requirements to develop and implement multi-faceted programs to protect workers from exposure to blood-borne pathogens, including preventing or minimizing any exposure through needle stick injuries. For purposes of transportation, some biological materials and laboratory supplies are classified as hazardous materials and are subject to regulation by one or more of the following agencies: the U.S. Department of Transportation, the U.S. Public Health Service, the United States Postal Service and the International Air Transport Association. We generally use third-party vendors to dispose of regulated medical waste, hazardous waste and radioactive materials and contractually require them to comply with applicable laws and regulations.

 

 
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International regulations

 

We market our tests outside of the United States and are subject to foreign regulatory requirements governing laboratory licensure, human clinical testing, use of tissue, privacy and data security, and marketing approval for our tests. These requirements vary by jurisdiction, differ from those in the United States and may require us to implement additional compliance measures or perform additional pre-clinical or clinical testing. On September 26, 2012, the European Commission released the first drafts of the new European Union ("EU") regulations for medical devices and IVDs that if finalized will impose additional regulatory requirements on IVDs used in the EU. In many countries outside of the United States, coverage, pricing and reimbursement approvals are also required. We are also required to maintain accurate information and control over sales and distributors' activities that may fall within the purview of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, its books and records provisions and its anti-bribery provisions.

 

Reimbursement and Billing

 

Reimbursement and billing for diagnostic services is generally highly complex. Laboratories must bill various payors, such as private third-party payors, including MCOs and state and federal health care programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, and each may have different billing requirements. Additionally, the audit requirements we must meet to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, as well as our internal compliance policies and procedures, add further complexity to the billing process. Other factors that complicate billing include:

 

·

variability in coverage and information requirements among various payors;

 

 

 

·

missing, incomplete or inaccurate billing information provided by ordering physicians;

 

 

 

·

billings to payors with whom we do not have contracts;

 

 

 

·

disputes with payors as to which party is responsible for payment; and

 

 

 

·

disputes with payors as to the appropriate level of reimbursement.

 

Depending on the reimbursement arrangement and applicable law, the party that reimburses us for our services may be:

 

·

a third party who provides coverage to the patient, such as an insurance company or MCO;

 

 

 

·

a governmental payor; or

 

 

 

·

the patient.

 

Federal and State Fraud and Abuse Laws

 

A variety of federal laws prohibit fraud and abuse involving state and federal health care programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid. These laws are interpreted broadly and enforced aggressively by various state and federal agencies, including CMS, the Department of Justice, the Office of Inspector General for the Department of Health and Human Services ("OIG"), and various state agencies. In addition, the Medicare and Medicaid programs increasingly use a variety of contractors to review claims data and to identify improper payments as well as fraud and abuse. Any overpayments identified must be repaid to the Medicare program unless a favorable decision is obtained on appeal. In some cases, these overpayments can be used as the basis for an extrapolation, by which the error rate is applied to a larger universe of claims, and which can result in even higher repayments.

 

Anti-Kickback Laws

 

The Anti-Kickback Statute prohibits, among other things, knowingly and willfully offering, paying, soliciting, receiving or providing remuneration, directly or indirectly, in exchange for or to induce either the referral of an individual, or the furnishing, arranging for or recommending of an item or service that is reimbursable, in whole or in part, by a federal health care program. "Remuneration" is broadly defined to include anything of value, such as, for example, cash payments, gifts or gift certificates, discounts, or the furnishing of services, supplies or equipment. The Anti-Kickback Statue is broad and prohibits many arrangements and practices that are lawful in businesses outside of the health care industry.

 

Recognizing the breadth of the Anti-Kickback Statute and the fact that it may technically prohibit many innocuous or beneficial arrangements within the health care industry, the OIG has issued a series of regulations, or safe harbors. Compliance with all requirements of a safe harbor immunizes the parties to the business arrangement from prosecution under the Anti-Kickback Statute. The failure of a business arrangement to fit within a safe harbor does not necessarily mean that the arrangement is illegal or that the OIG will pursue prosecution. Still, in the absence of an applicable safe harbor, a violation of the Anti-Kickback Statute may occur even if only one purpose of an arrangement is to induce referrals. The penalties for violating the Anti-Kickback Statute can be severe. These sanctions include criminal and civil penalties, imprisonment and possible exclusion from the federal health care programs. Many states have adopted laws similar to the Anti-Kickback Statute, and some apply to items and services reimbursable by any payor, including private third-party payors.

 

 
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Physician Self-Referral Bans

 

The federal ban on physician self-referrals, commonly known as the Stark Law, prohibits, subject to certain exceptions, physician referrals of Medicare patients to an entity providing certain designated health services, which include laboratory services, if the physician or an immediate family member of the physician has any financial relationship with the entity. Several Stark Law exceptions are relevant to arrangements involving clinical laboratories, including: (1) fair market value compensation for the provision of items or services; (2) payments by physicians to a laboratory for clinical laboratory services; (3) certain space and equipment rental arrangements that satisfy certain requirements; and (4) personal services arrangements. Penalties for violating the Stark Law include the return of funds received for all prohibited referrals, fines, civil monetary penalties and possible exclusion from the federal health care programs. In addition to the Stark Law, many states have their own self-referral bans, which may extend to all self-referrals, regardless of the payor.

 

State and Federal Prohibitions on False Claims

 

The federal False Claims Act imposes liability on any person or entity that, among other things, knowingly presents, or causes to be presented, a false or fraudulent claim for payment to the federal government. Under the False Claims Act, a person acts knowingly if he has actual knowledge of the information or acts in deliberate ignorance or in reckless disregard of the truth or falsity of the information. Specific intent to defraud is not required. The qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act allow a private individual to bring an action on behalf of the federal government and to share in any amounts paid by the defendant to the government in connection with the action. Penalties include payment of up to three times the actual damages sustained by the government, plus civil penalties of between $5,500 and $11,000 for each false claim, as well as possible exclusion from the federal health care programs. In addition, various states have enacted similar laws modeled after the False Claims Act that apply to items and services reimbursed under Medicaid and other state health care programs, and, in several states, such laws apply to claims submitted to any payor.

 

Civil Monetary Penalties Law

 

The federal Civil Monetary Penalties Law, or the CMP Law, prohibits, among other things (1) the offering or transfer of remuneration to a Medicare or state health care program beneficiary if the person knows or should know it is likely to influence the beneficiary's selection of a particular provider, practitioner, or supplier of services reimbursable by Medicare or a state health care program, unless an exception applies; (2) employing or contracting with an individual or entity that the provider knows or should know is excluded from participation in a federal health care program; (3) billing for services requested by an unlicensed physician or an excluded provider; and (4) billing for medically unnecessary services. The penalties for violating the CMP Law include exclusion, substantial fines, and payment of up to three times the amount billed, depending on the nature of the offense.

 

Governmental Regulation, Approval and Compliance (Oil & Gas Exploration)

 

The Leases, and the exploration and development of the Leases, will be subject to various types of regulation at the federal, state and local levels. Such regulations includes requiring permits for the drilling of wells; maintaining bonding requirements in order to drill or operate wells; implementing spill prevention plans; submitting notification and receiving permits relating to the presence, use and release of certain materials incidental to oil and gas operations; and regulating the location of wells, the method of drilling and casing wells, the use, transportation, storage and disposal of fluids and materials used in connection with drilling and production activities, surface usage and the restoration of properties upon which wells have been drilled, the plugging and abandoning of wells and the transporting of production. The operations of any oil and gas wells will also be subject to various conservation matters, including the regulation of the size of drilling and spacing units or pro-ration units, the number of wells which may be drilled in a unit, and the unitization or pooling of oil and gas properties. In addition, state conservation laws establish maximum rates of production from oil and gas wells, generally limit the venting or flaring of gas, and impose certain requirements regarding the ratable purchase of production. The effect of these regulations is to limit the amounts of oil and gas these wells may be able to produce and to limit the number of wells or the locations on which wells may be drilled. Even though the Company will not be actively operating the Leases, its financial performance and results of operations will be affected by numerous laws and regulations, including energy, environmental, conservation, tax and other laws and regulations relating to the oil and gas industry.

 

Environmental Regulation

 

The Leases, and the exploration and development of the Leases, will be subject to stringent federal, state and local laws and regulations governing environmental quality, including those relating to oil spills and pollution control, that are constantly changing. Should the Company and its operating partners fail to comply with existing federal, state and local laws, rules and regulations governing the release of materials into the environment or otherwise relating to the protection of the environment, such failure may have a material adverse effect upon its business operations and operating results.

 

 
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Employees

 

The Company has one active employee, who is the Company's Chief Executive Officer. The Company has not experienced any work disruptions or stoppages and it considers relations with its employee to be good. No employee of the Company is covered by a collective-bargaining agreement.

 

Available Information

 

You may obtain free copies of our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and Current Reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports, as soon as reasonably practicable after they are electronically filed or furnished to the SEC, on the Investors section of our website at www.avantdiagnostics.com. Information found on our website is not incorporated by reference into this report. We make available free of charge through our website our Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, filings furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the SEC.

  

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS.

 

An investment in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. In determining whether to purchase our common stock, an investor should carefully consider all of the material risks described below, together with the other information contained in this report before making a decision to purchase our securities. An investor should only purchase our securities if he or she can afford to suffer the loss of his or her entire investment.

 

Risks Relating to Our Business and Industry

 

The report from our Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm contains as exoplanetary paragraph about our ability to continue as a going concern,

 

If we are unable to continue as a going concern, our securities will have little or no value

 

As of September 30, 2015 we had an accumulated deficit of $9,814,078. We currently do not anticipate that our cash will be sufficient to fund our operations through September 30, 2016 without raising additional capital. Our continuation as a going concern is dependent upon continued financial support from our stockholders, the ability of us to obtain necessary equity and/or debt financing to continue operations, and the attainment of profitable operations. These factors raise substantial doubt regarding our ability to continue as a going concern. We cannot make any assurances that additional financings will be available to us and, if available, completed on a timely basis, on acceptable terms or at all. If we are unable to complete a debt or equity offering, or otherwise obtain sufficient financing when and if needed, it would negatively impact our business and operations, which would likely cause the price of our common stock to decline. It could also lead to the reduction or suspension of our operations and ultimately force us to cease our operations.

 

We are at an early stage of development as a company and do not have any products that generate revenues.

 

We are a life sciences company. At this time, we do not have any commercial products or laboratory services that generate revenues. Our existing diagnostic offerings will require additional regulatory review, including the FDA, significant marketing efforts and substantial investment before they could provide any revenues. Given our early stage, we estimate initial marketing of OvaDxÒ Janaury 2018 , after we have received FDA approval for OvaDxÒ.

 

We have a history of net losses, and we expect to incur net losses for the foreseeable future and we expect to continue to incur significant expenses to develop and commercialize our tests.

 

We have incurred substantial net losses since our inception. For the fiscal years ended September 30, 2015 and 2014, we incurred net losses of $3,343,078 and $525,000, respectively. From our inception in July 2009 through September 30, 2015, we had an accumulated deficit of $9,814,078. To date, we have not achieved, and we may never achieve, revenues sufficient to offset expenses. We expect to devote substantially all of our resources to continue commercializing and enhancing OvaDxÒ. We expect to incur additional losses in the future, and we may never achieve profitability.

 

We have identified a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting. If we fail to develop and maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results in a timely manner, which may adversely affect investor confidence in our company.

 

In connection with the audit of our consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended September 30, 2015, our management identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, as defined in the standards established by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board of the U.S. A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. The material weaknesses related to a lack of a full segregation of duties and to our lack of sufficient personnel in our accounting and financial reporting functions with sufficient experience and expertise with respect to the application of U.S. GAAP and related financial reporting. Please see "Controls and Procedures—Internal Control Over Financial Reporting" for information regarding our remediation efforts. Our management did not and were not required to perform an evaluation of our internal control over financial reporting as of and for the year ended September 30, 2014 in accordance with the provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Had we performed such an evaluation, additional control deficiencies may have been identified by management, and those control deficiencies could have also represented one or more material weaknesses.

 

 
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We cannot be certain that any measures we undertake will successfully remediate the material weakness or that other material weaknesses and control deficiencies will not be discovered in the future. If our remediation efforts are not successful or other material weaknesses or control deficiencies occur in the future, we may be unable to report our financial results accurately on a timely basis, which could cause our reported financial results to be materially misstated and result in the loss of investor confidence or delisting and cause the market price of our common stock to decline.

 

We do not have our own diagnostic research facilities and will be dependent on third parties for diagnostic product development.

 

We do not have our own research and development facilities dedicated to diagnostic development and may engage consultants and independent contract research organizations to design and conduct clinical trials in connection with the development of our diagnostic products. As a result, these important aspects of a product's development will be outside of our direct control. In addition, there can be no assurance that such third parties will perform all of their obligations under arrangements with us or will perform those obligations satisfactorily.

 

If we fail to obtain additional financing, we will be unable to complete the development and commercialization of our product candidates or continue our research and development programs.

 

In addition to the funds raised in our recent private placements, we may be required to raise additional capital to complete the development and to begin commercialization of our current and future product candidates. If we are unable to raise additional capital when required or on acceptable terms, we may have to significantly delay, scale back or discontinue one or more of our clinical trials, and the commercialization of our diagnostic tests.

 

If third-party payors, including managed care organizations and Medicare, do not provide reimbursement for our products, their commercial success could be compromised.

 

Physicians and patients may decide not to order the OvaDxÒ unless third-party payors, such as managed care organizations as well as government payors such as Medicare and Medicaid, pay a substantial portion or all of the test's price. There is significant uncertainty concerning third-party reimbursement of any test incorporating new technology, including OvaDxÒ, and any of our future diagnostics and therapies. Reimbursement by a third-party payor may depend on a number of factors, including a payor's determination that tests using our technologies are:

 

·

not experimental or investigational,

 

 

 

·

medically necessary,

 

 

 

·

appropriate for the specific patient,

 

 

 

·

cost-effective, and

 

 

 

·

supported by peer-reviewed publications.

 

Since each payor makes its own decision as to whether to establish a policy to reimburse, seeking these approvals is a time-consuming and costly process. To date, we have not secured policy-level reimbursement approval from any third-party payors and have no approvals for state Medicaid programs. We cannot be certain that coverage for our products will be provided in the future by any third-party payors.

 

Several entities conduct technology assessments of new medical tests and devices and provide the results of their assessments for informational purposes to other parties. These assessments may be used by third-party payors and health care providers such as Blue Cross and Blue Shield plans, which collectively provide healthcare coverage for nearly one-third of all Americans, as grounds to deny coverage for a test or procedure. These assessments have not yet been carried for our Ovarian Cancer Diagnostic test. We can offer no assurance that these evaluations will ever be conducted, and if conducted, will result in a positive conclusion resulting in any third party reimbursement to us.

 

Insurers, including managed care organizations as well as government payors such as Medicare, have increased their efforts to control the cost, utilization and delivery of health care services. From time to time, the United States Congress has considered and implemented changes in the Medicare fee schedules in conjunction with budgetary legislation. Further reductions of reimbursement for Medicare services may be implemented from time to time. Reductions in the reimbursement rates of other third-party payors have occurred and may occur in the future. These measures have resulted in reduced prices, added costs and decreased test utilization for the clinical laboratory industry.

 

If we are unable to obtain reimbursement approval from private payors and Medicare and Medicaid programs for our diagnostic tests, or if the amount reimbursed is inadequate, our ability to generate revenues could be limited. Even if we are being reimbursed, insurers may withdraw their coverage policies or cancel their contracts with us at any time or stop paying for our tests, which would reduce our revenue.

 

 
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We may experience delays in our clinical trials that could adversely affect our financial position and our commercial prospects.

 

Any delays in completing our clinical trials for OvaDxÒ and our platform of diagnostics assays may delay our ability to raise additional capital or to generate revenue, and we may have insufficient capital resources to support our operations. Even if we have sufficient capital resources, the ability to become profitable will be delayed if there are problems with the timing or completion of our clinical trials.

 

If our product candidates do not meet safety or efficacy endpoints in clinical evaluations, they will not receive regulatory approval and we will be unable to market them.

 

The regulatory approval process typically is extremely expensive, takes many years and the timing of any approval cannot be accurately predicted. If we fail to obtain regulatory approval for our current or future product candidates, we will be unable to market and sell such products and therefore may never be profitable. The FDA and other regulatory agencies can delay, limit or deny approval for many reasons, including: (i) a product candidate may not be safe or effective; (ii) the manufacturing processes or facilities we have selected may not meet the applicable requirements; and (iii) changes in FDA's approval policies or adoption of new regulations may require additional work. Any delay in, or failure to receive or maintain, regulatory approval for any of our products could prevent us from ever generating meaningful revenues or achieving profitability.

 

Even if we receive regulatory approvals, our product candidates may later exhibit adverse effects that limit or prevent their widespread use or that force us to withdraw those product candidates from the market. In addition, a marketed product continues to be subject to strict regulation after approval. Any unforeseen problems with an approved product or any violation of regulations could result in restrictions on the product, including our withdrawal from the market. Any delay in, or failure to receive or maintain regulatory approval for, any of our products could prevent us from ever generating meaningful revenues or achieving profitability.

 

Healthcare policy changes, including recently enacted legislation reforming the U.S. healthcare system, may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Affordability Reconciliation Act, collectively, the PPACA, enacted in March 2010, makes changes that are expected to significantly impact the pharmaceutical and medical device industries and clinical laboratories. Beginning in 2013, each medical device manufacturer will have to pay a sales tax in an amount equal to 2.3% of the price for which such manufacturer sells its medical devices that are listed with the FDA. Although the FDA has contended that clinical laboratory tests that are developed and validated by a laboratory for its own use, or LDTs, such as our MetaSite Breast test are medical devices, none of our products are currently listed with the FDA. We cannot assure you that the tax will not be extended to services such as ours in the future. The PPACA also mandates a reduction in payments for clinical laboratory services paid under the Medicare Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule, or CLFS, of 1.75% through 2015 and a productivity adjustment to the CLFS.

 

Other significant measures contained in the PPACA include, for example, coordination and promotion of research on comparative clinical effectiveness of different technologies and procedures, initiatives to revise Medicare payment methodologies, such as bundling of payments across the continuum of care by providers and physicians, and initiatives to promote quality indicators in payment methodologies. The PPACA also includes significant new fraud and abuse measures, including required disclosures of financial arrangements with physician customers, lower thresholds for violations and increasing potential penalties for such violations. In addition, the PPACA establishes an Independent Payment Advisory Board, or IPAB, to reduce the per capita rate of growth in Medicare spending. The IPAB has broad discretion to propose policies to reduce expenditures, which may have a negative impact on payment rates for services. The IPAB proposals may impact payments for clinical laboratory services beginning in 2016 and for hospital services beginning in 2020. We are monitoring the impact of the PPACA in order to enable us to determine the trends and changes that may be necessitated by the legislation that may potentially impact on our business over time.

 

In addition to the PPACA, the effect of which cannot presently be fully quantified given its recent enactment, various healthcare reform proposals have also emerged from federal and state governments. For example, in February 2012, Congress passed the "Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012" which in part reduced the potential future cost-based increases to the Medicare Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule by 2%. Overall the expected total fee cut to the CLFS for 2013 is 2.95% not including a further reduction of 2% anticipated from implementation of the automatic expense reductions (sequester) under the Budget Control Act of 2011, which will go into effect for dates of service on or after April 1, 2013 unless Congress acts to modify the automatic cuts.

 

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, CMS, sought public input through the notice and comment period for the Proposed Medicare Physician Fee Schedule, on whether all new AMA Molecular Diagnostic codes be placed on either the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule, which would likely require a 20% patient co-payment for such services, or remain on the CLFS. On November 1, 2012, CMS issued a final rule on the Physician Fee Schedule, which described that these new codes would be placed on the CLFS. On August 31, 2012, CMS also issued a preliminary determination for the 2013 CLFS which proposed not to recognize Multi-Analyte codes with Algorithmic Analyses, or MAAA, and questioned whether algorithm-based tests are covered benefits for Medicare beneficiaries. However, in its final determination released on November 6, 2012, CMS deleted the statement about not covering algorithmic analysis, and stated that laboratories performing MAAA tests for Medicare beneficiaries should continue to bill for these tests in 2013 as they are currently billed under the CLFS. CMS intends to consider its payment policy for MAAAs again in 2013 and may issue a determination to pay or not pay for these tests beginning in 2014. Our current Medicare reimbursement determination was set by a local coverage decision and not set nationally by CMS. These or any future changes in covered benefit determination, proposed fees or mandated reductions in payments may apply to some or all of our clinical laboratory tests delivered to Medicare beneficiaries.

 

 
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Changes in healthcare policy, such as the creation of broad test utilization limits for diagnostic products in general or requirements that Medicare patients pay for portions of clinical laboratory tests or services received, could substantially impact the sales of our tests, decrease revenues, increase costs and divert management's attention from our business.

 

We cannot predict whether future healthcare initiatives will be implemented at the federal or state level or in countries outside of the United States in which we may do business, or the effect any future legislation or regulation will have on us. The taxes imposed by the new federal legislation, cost reduction measures and the expansion in government's role in the U.S. healthcare industry may result in decreased profits to us, lower reimbursements by payors for our products or reduced medical procedure volumes, all of which may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, sales of our tests outside the United States make us subject to foreign regulatory requirements and cost-reduction measures, which may also change over time.

 

Testing of potential products may be required and there is no assurance of FDA or any other regulatory approval.

 

The FDA and comparable agencies in foreign countries impose substantial requirements upon the introduction of both therapeutic and diagnostic biomedical products, through lengthy and detailed laboratory and clinical testing procedures, sampling activities and other costly and time-consuming procedures. Satisfaction of these requirements typically takes several years or more and varies substantially based upon the type, complexity, and novelty of the product. The effect of government regulation and the need for FDA approval may be to delay marketing of new products for a considerable period of time, to impose costly procedures upon our activities, and to provide an advantage to larger companies that compete with us. There can be no assurance that FDA or other regulatory approval for any products developed by us will be granted on a timely basis or at all. Any such delay in obtaining, or failure to obtain, such approvals would materially and adversely affect the marketing of any contemplated products and the ability to earn product revenue. Further, regulation of manufacturing facilities by state, local, and other authorities is subject to change. Any additional regulation could result in limitations or restrictions on our ability to utilize any of our technologies, thereby adversely affecting our operations. Human diagnostic and pharmaceutical products are subject to rigorous preclinical testing and clinical trials and other approval procedures mandated by the FDA and foreign regulatory authorities. Various federal and foreign statutes and regulations also govern or influence the manufacturing, safety, labeling, storage, record keeping and marketing of pharmaceutical products. The process of obtaining these approvals and the subsequent compliance with appropriate United States and foreign statutes and regulations are time-consuming and require the expenditure of substantial resources. In addition, these requirements and processes vary widely from country to country. Among the uncertainties and risks of the FDA approval process are the following: (i) the possibility that studies and clinical trials will fail to prove the safety and efficacy of the product, or that any demonstrated efficacy will be so limited as to significantly reduce or altogether eliminate the acceptability of the product in the marketplace, (ii) the possibility that the costs of development, which can far exceed the best of estimates, may render commercialization of the drug marginally profitable or altogether unprofitable, and (iii) the possibility that the amount of time required for FDA approval of a product may extend for years beyond that which is originally estimated. In addition, the FDA or similar foreign regulatory authorities may require additional clinical trials, which could result in increased costs and significant development delays. Delays or rejections may also be encountered based upon changes in FDA policy and the establishment of additional regulations during the period of product development and FDA review. Similar delays or rejections may be encountered in other countries.

 

If we were required to conduct additional clinical trials prior to marketing our diagnostic tests, those trials could lead to delays or failure to obtain necessary regulatory approvals and harm our ability to become profitable.

 

The FDA requires extensive pre-market clinical testing prior to submitting a regulatory application for commercial sales. OvaDx Ò and our other product candidates require pre-market clinical trials, and whether using prospectively acquired samples or archival samples, delays in the commencement or completion of clinical testing could significantly increase our test development costs and delay commercialization. Many of the factors that may cause or lead to a delay in the commencement or completion of clinical trials may also ultimately lead to delay or denial of regulatory approval. The commencement of clinical trials may be delayed due to insufficient patient enrollment, which is a function of many factors, including the size of the patient population, the nature of the protocol, the proximity of patients to clinical sites and the eligibility criteria for the clinical trial. We may find it necessary to engage contract research organizations to perform data collection and analysis and other aspects of our clinical trials, which might increase the cost and complexity of our trials. We may also depend on clinical investigators, medical institutions and contract research organizations to perform the trials properly. If these parties do not successfully carry out their contractual duties or obligations or meet expected deadlines, or if the quality, completeness or accuracy of the clinical data they obtain is compromised due to the failure to adhere to our clinical protocols or for other reasons, our clinical trials may have to be extended, delayed or terminated. Many of these factors would be beyond our control. We may not be able to enter into replacement arrangements without undue delays or considerable expenditures. If there are delays in testing or approvals as a result of the failure to perform by third parties, our research and development costs would increase, and we may not be able to obtain regulatory approval for our test. In addition, we may not be able to establish or maintain relationships with these parties on favorable terms, if at all. Each of these outcomes would harm our ability to market our test, or to become profitable.

 

 
15
 

 

Complying with numerous regulations pertaining to our business is an expensive and time-consuming process, and any failure to comply could result in substantial penalties.

 

We are subject to other regulations by both the federal government and the states in which we conduct our business, including:

 

·

Medicare billing and payment regulations applicable to clinical laboratories;

 

 

 

·

the federal Medicare and Medicaid Anti-kickback Law and state anti-kickback prohibitions;

 

 

 

·

the federal physician self-referral prohibition, commonly known as the Stark Law, and the state equivalents;

 

 

 

·

the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996;

 

 

 

·

the Medicare civil money penalty and exclusion requirements; and

 

 

 

·

the federal civil and criminal False Claims Act.

 

We have and will continue to adopt policies and procedures designed to comply with these laws, including policies and procedures relating to financial arrangements between us and physicians who refer patients to us. In the ordinary course of our business, we conduct internal reviews of our compliance with these laws. Our compliance is also subject to governmental review. The growth of our business and sales organization may increase the potential of violating these laws or our internal policies and procedures. The risk of our being found in violation of these laws and regulations is further increased by the fact that many of them have not been fully interpreted by the regulatory authorities or the courts, and their provisions are open to a variety of interpretations. Any action brought against us for violation of these laws or regulations, even if we successfully defend against it, could cause us to incur significant legal expenses and divert our management's attention from the operation of our business. If our operations are found to be in violation of any of these laws and regulations, we may be subject to any applicable penalty associated with the violation, including civil and criminal penalties, damages and fines, we could be required to refund payments received by us, and we could be required to curtail or cease our operations. Any of the foregoing consequences could seriously harm our business and our financial results.

 

Initially, our financial results will depend on sales of one test, the OvaDxÒtest, and we will need to generate sufficient revenues from this and our other diagnostics or therapies to run our business.

 

For the foreseeable future, we expect to derive substantially all of our revenues from sales of OvaDxÒ. We anticipate commencing full implementation of our sales and marketing strategy as early as January 2018. We are in various stages of research and development for other function-based diagnostic assays that we may offer as well as for enhancements to our existing test. We do not currently expect to commercialize these additional tests for other disease indications until at least 2018. If we are unable to increase sales of OvaDxÒ or to successfully develop and commercialize other diagnostic tests, enhancements, our revenues and our ability to achieve profitability would be impaired, and the market price of our common stock could decline.

 

We may experience limits on our revenues if physicians decide not to order our tests.

 

If medical practitioners do not order OvaDxÒ or any future tests developed by us, we will likely not be able to create demand for our products in sufficient volume for us to become profitable. To generate demand, we will need to continue to make oncologists, surgeons and pathologists aware of the benefits of OvaDxÒ and any products we may develop in the future through published papers, presentations at scientific conferences and one-on-one education by our sales force. Some physicians may decide not to order our test due to its price, part or all of which may be payable directly by the patient if the applicable payor denies reimbursement in full or in part. Even if patients recommend that their physicians use our test, physicians may still decide not to use OvaDxÒ, either because they have not been made aware of its utility or they wish to pursue a particular course of therapy regardless of test results. If only a small portion of the physician population decides to use our test, we will experience limits on our revenues and our ability to achieve profitability. In addition, we will need to demonstrate our ability to obtain adequate reimbursement coverage from third-party payors.

 

We may experience limits on our revenues if patients decide not to use our test.

 

Some patients may decide not to order our test due to its price, part or all of which may be payable directly by the patient if the applicable payor denies reimbursement in full or in part. Even if medical practitioners recommend that their patients use our test, patients may still decide not to use OvaDxÒ, either because they do not want to be made aware of the likelihood of metastasis or they wish to pursue a particular course of therapy regardless of test results. If only a small portion of the patient population decides to use our test, we will experience limits on our revenues and our ability to achieve profitability.

 

 
16
 

 

If we are unable to develop products to keep pace with rapid technological, medical and scientific change, our operating results and competitive position would be harmed.

 

In recent years, there have been numerous advances in technologies relating to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. These advances require us to continuously develop new products and enhance existing products to keep pace with evolving standards of care. Our tests could become obsolete unless we continually innovate and expand our products to demonstrate recurrence and treatment benefit in patients treated with new therapies. New treatment therapies typically have only a few years of clinical data associated with them, which limits our ability to perform clinical studies and correlate sets of genes to a new treatment's effectiveness. If we are unable to demonstrate the applicability of our test to new treatments, then sales of our test could decline, which would harm our revenues.

 

If we become subject to product liability claims, the damages may exceed insurance coverage levels.

 

We will obtain liability insurance for our product candidates as each is entered into large population validation studies and/or any other studies where such liability insurance is needed. We cannot predict all of the possible harms or side effects that may result from the use of our products and, therefore, the amount of insurance coverage we currently hold, or that we or our collaborators may obtain, may not be adequate to protect us from any claims arising from the use of our products that are beyond the limit of our insurance coverage. If we cannot protect against potential liability claims, we or our collaborators may find it difficult or impossible to commercialize our products, and we may not be able to renew or increase our insurance coverage on reasonable terms, if at all.

 

If we are unable to develop adequate sales, marketing or distribution capabilities or enter into agreements with third parties to perform some of these functions, we will not be able to commercialize our products effectively.

 

We may have a limited infrastructure in sales, marketing and distribution. To directly market and distribute any products, we must effectively build a sales and marketing organization with appropriate technical expertise and distribution capabilities. We may not be able to establish sales, marketing and distribution capabilities of our own or enter into such arrangements with third parties in a timely manner or on acceptable terms.

 

If we do not find development and commercialization collaborators for our product candidates, we may have to reduce or delay our rate of product development and commercialization and increase our expenditures.

 

We may enter into relationships with selected biotechnology companies to help develop and commercialize our product candidates. If we are not able to establish such collaborative arrangements, we may have to reduce or delay further development of some of our programs, increase our planned expenditures and undertake development and commercialization activities at our own expense.

 

If we enter into development or commercialization collaborations with biotechnology companies, these relationships will also be subject to a number of risks, including: (i) collaborators may not pursue further development and commercialization of products resulting from collaborations or may elect not to renew research and development programs; (ii) collaborators may delay clinical trials, underfund a clinical trial program, stop a clinical trial or abandon a product candidate, repeat or conduct new clinical trials or require the development of a new formulation of a product candidate for clinical testing; (iii) a collaborator with marketing and distribution rights to one or more of our products may not commit enough resources to the marketing and distribution of our products, limiting our potential revenues from the commercialization of these products; and (iv) disputes may arise delaying or terminating the research, development or commercialization of our product candidates, or result in significant legal proceedings.

 

Once we have a laboratory facility, it will be our sole laboratory facility and should it become inoperable, we will be unable to perform our tests and our business will be harmed.

 

We do not currently have laboratory facilities. However, we do expect to utilize the laboratory facilities of our affiliate. The facility may be harmed or rendered inoperable by natural or man-made disasters, including earthquakes, flooding and power outages, which may render it difficult or impossible for us to perform our tests for some period of time. The inability to perform our tests may result in the loss of customers or harm our reputation, and we may be unable to regain those customers in the future. 

 

In order to rely on a third party to perform our tests, we could only use another facility with established state licensure and CLIA accreditation under the scope of which OvaDxÒ could be performed following validation and other required procedures. We cannot assure you that we would be able to find another CLIA-certified facility willing to adopt OvaDxÒ and comply with the required procedures, or that this laboratory would be willing to perform the tests for us on commercially reasonable terms. In order to establish a redundant laboratory facility, we would have to spend considerable time and money securing adequate space, constructing the facility, recruiting and training employees, and establishing the additional operational and administrative infrastructure necessary to support a second facility. Additionally, any new clinical laboratory facility opened by us would be subject to certification under CLIA and licensed by several states, including California and New York, which can take a significant amount of time and result in delays in our ability to begin operations.

 

 
17
 

 

Our success depends on retention of key personnel.

 

We are dependent on our management team members, including Gregg Linn, our President and Chief Executive Officer. Our future success also will depend in large part on our continued ability to attract and retain other highly qualified scientific, technical and management personnel, as well as personnel with expertise in sales and marketing, clinical testing, and governmental regulation. We face competition for personnel from other companies, universities, public and private research institutions, government entities and other organizations. If we are unsuccessful in our recruitment and retention efforts, our business will be harmed.

 

Our corporate compliance program cannot guarantee that we are in compliance with all potentially applicable regulations.

 

The development, manufacturing, pricing, sales, and reimbursement of our products, together with our general operations, are subject to extensive regulation by federal, state and other authorities within the United States and numerous entities outside of the United States. While we have developed and instituted a corporate compliance program based on what we believe are the current best practices, we cannot assure you that we are or will be in compliance with all potentially applicable regulations. If we fail to comply with any of these regulations, we could be subject to a range of regulatory actions, including suspension or termination of clinical trials, the failure to approve a product candidate, restrictions on our products or manufacturing processes, withdrawal of products from the market, significant fines, or other sanctions or litigation. 

 

Our operations may involve hazardous materials, and compliance with environmental laws and regulations is expensive.

 

Our future research and development activities may involve the controlled use of hazardous materials, including chemicals that cause cancer, volatile solvents, radioactive materials and biological materials including human tissue samples that have the potential to transmit diseases. Our operations may also produce hazardous waste products. We are subject to a variety of federal, state and local regulations relating to the use, handling and disposal of these materials. We generally may contract with third parties for the disposal of such substances and may store certain low level radioactive waste at our facility until the materials are no longer considered radioactive. While we believe that we will comply with then current regulatory requirements, we cannot eliminate the risk of accidental contamination or injury from these materials. We may be required to incur substantial costs to comply with current or future environmental and safety regulations. If an accident or contamination occurred, we would likely incur significant costs associated with civil penalties or criminal fines and in complying with environmental laws and regulations.

 

If we use biological and hazardous materials in a manner that causes injury, we could be liable for damages.

 

Our activities may require the controlled use of potentially harmful biological materials, hazardous materials and chemicals and may in the future require the use of radioactive compounds. We cannot eliminate the risk of accidental contamination or injury to employees or third parties from the use, storage, handling or disposal of these materials. In the event of contamination or injury, we could be held liable for any resulting damages, and any liability could exceed our resources or any applicable insurance coverage we may have. Additionally, we are subject on an ongoing basis to federal, state and local laws and regulations governing the use, storage, handling and disposal of these materials and specified waste products. The cost of compliance with these laws and regulations might be significant and could negatively affect our operating results.

 

Risks Related to our Securities

 

Insiders have substantial control over us, and they could delay or prevent a change in our corporate control even if our other stockholders wanted it to occur.

 

Our executive officers, directors, and principal stockholders hold approximately a large majority of our outstanding common stock. Accordingly, these stockholders are able to control all matters requiring stockholder approval, including the election of directors and approval of significant corporate transactions. This could delay or prevent an outside party from acquiring or merging with us even if our other stockholders wanted it to occur.

 

We cannot assure you that the common stock will become liquid or that it will be listed on a securities exchange. In addition, there may not be sufficient liquidity in the market for our securities in order for investors to sell their securities.

 

Currently, we are quoted on the OTCQB maintained by OTCMarkets, Inc. under the symbol AVDX, where an investor may find it difficult to obtain accurate quotations as to the market value of our common stock. In addition, if we fail to meet the criteria set forth in SEC regulations, by law, various requirements would be imposed on broker-dealers who sell its securities to persons other than established customers and accredited investors. Consequently, such regulations may deter broker-dealers from recommending or selling our common stock, which may further affect its liquidity. In addition, there is currently only a limited public market for our common stock and there can be no assurance that a trading market will develop further or be maintained in the future.

 

 
18
 

 

In order to raise sufficient funds to expand our operations, we may have to issue additional securities at prices, which may result in substantial dilution to our stockholders.

 

If we raise additional funds through the sale of equity or convertible debt, our current stockholders' percentage ownership will be reduced. In addition, these transactions may dilute the value of our outstanding securities. We may have to issue securities that may have rights, preferences and privileges senior to our common stock. We cannot provide assurance that we will be able to raise additional funds on terms acceptable to us, if at all. If future financing is not available or is not available on acceptable terms, we may not be able to fund our future needs, which would have a material adverse effect on our business plans, prospects, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Our stock price is highly volatile, and our stock may lose all or a significant part of its value.

 

The market prices for securities of molecular diagnostic companies have been volatile. This volatility has significantly affected the market prices for these securities for reasons frequently unrelated to the operating performance of the specific companies. These broad market fluctuations may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

 

In addition, the stock market in general has experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations. Events or factors that may have a significant impact on our business and on the market price of our common stock include the following:

 

·

failure of any of our recently launched tests and any new test candidates to achieve commercial success;

 

 

 

·

failure to sustain revenue growth or margins in our molecular diagnostic business;

 

 

 

·

changes in the structure of healthcare payment systems and changes in the governmental or private insurers reimbursement levels for our molecular diagnostic tests;

 

 

 

·

introduction of new commercial tests or technological innovations by competitors;

 

 

 

·

termination of the licenses underlying our molecular diagnostic and pharmaceutical and clinical services;

 

 

 

·

delays or other problems with operating our laboratory facilities;

 

 

 

·

failure of any of our research and development programs;

 

 

 

·

changes in intellectual property laws of our patents or enforcement in the United States and foreign countries;

 

 

 

·

developments or disputes concerning patents or other proprietary rights involving us directly or otherwise affecting the industry as a whole;

 

 

 

·

missing or changing the financial guidance we provide;

 

 

 

·

changes in estimates or recommendations by securities analysts relating to our common stock or the securities of our competitors;

 

 

 

·

changes in the governmental regulatory approved process for our existing and new tests:

 

 

 

·

failure to meet estimates or recommendations by securities analysts that cover our common stock;

 

 

 

·

public concern over our approved tests and any test candidates;

 

 

 

·

litigation;

 

 

 

·

future sales or anticipated sales of our common stock by us or our stockholders;

 

 

 

·

the timing and amount of repurchases of our common stock;

 

 

 

·

general market conditions;

 

 

 

·

seasonal slowness in sales, particularly in the quarters ending September 30 and March 31, the effects of which may be difficult to understand during periods of growth;

 

 

 

·

economic, healthcare and diagnostic trends, disasters or crises and other external factors; and

 

 

 

·

period-to-period fluctuations in our financial results.

 

These and other external factors may cause the market price and demand for our common stock to fluctuate substantially, which may limit or prevent investors from readily selling their shares of common stock and may otherwise negatively affect the liquidity of our common stock. In addition, securities class action litigation against companies has been on the rise. If any of our stockholders brought a lawsuit against us, we could incur substantial costs defending the lawsuit regardless of the outcome. Such a lawsuit could also divert the time and attention of our management.

 

Investors may face significant restrictions on the resale of our common stock due to federal regulations of penny stocks.

 

Our common stock will be subject to the requirements of Rule 15(g) 9, promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act as long as the price of our common stock is below $5.00 per share. Under such rule, broker-dealers who recommend low-priced securities to persons other than established customers and accredited investors must satisfy special sales practice requirements, including a requirement that they make an individualized written suitability determination for the purchaser and receive the purchaser's consent prior to the transaction. The Securities Enforcement Remedies and Penny Stock Reform Act of 1990, also requires additional disclosure in connection with any trades involving a stock defined as a penny stock.

 

 
19
 

 

Generally, the Commission defines a penny stock as any equity security not traded on an exchange or quoted on NASDAQ that has a market price of less than $5.00 per share. The required penny stock disclosures include the delivery, prior to any transaction, of a disclosure schedule explaining the penny stock market and the risks associated with it. Such requirements could severely limit the market liquidity of the securities and the ability of purchasers to sell their securities in the secondary market.

 

In addition, various state securities laws impose restrictions on transferring "penny stocks" and as a result, investors in the common stock may have their ability to sell their shares of the common stock impaired.

 

Failure to meet previously announced financial expectations could have an adverse impact on the market price of our common stock.

 

Our ability to achieve announced financial targets is subject to a number of risks, uncertainties and other factors affecting its business and the health care industry generally, many of which are beyond Diagnostics' control. These factors may cause actual results to differ materially. The Company describes a number of these factors throughout this document, including in these Risk Factors. The Company cannot assure you that it will meet the targets when announced. If the Company is not able to meet these targets, it could harm the market price of its common stock.

 

Future sales of our common stock could adversely affect its stock price and its ability to raise capital in the future.

 

Future sales of substantial amounts of the Company's common stock could harm the market price of its stock. This also could harm the Company's ability to raise capital in the future. Certain shares issued in conjunction with the Exchange Agreement are expected to be registered through the filing of a registration statement with the SEC. These shares will then be freely tradable without restriction under the Securities Act of 1933 (the "Securities Act") by persons other than "affiliates," as defined under the Securities Act. Any sales of substantial amounts of the Company's common stock in the public market, or the perception that those sales might occur, could harm the market price of the Company's common stock.

 

The Company will not solicit the approval of its stockholders for the issuance of authorized but unissued shares of the Company's common stock unless this approval is deemed advisable by our board of directors or is required by applicable law, regulation or any applicable stock exchange listing requirements. The issuance of those shares could dilute the value of the Company's outstanding shares of common stock.

 

State securities laws may limit secondary trading that will restrict the states in which you can sell shares.

 

Secondary trading in our common stock will not be possible in any state until the common stock is qualified for sale under the applicable securities laws of the state or there is confirmation that an exemption, such as listing in certain recognized securities manuals, is available for secondary trading in the state. If we fail to register or qualify, or to obtain or verify an exemption for the secondary trading of, the common stock in any particular state, the common stock could not be offered or sold to, or purchased by, a resident of that state. In the event that a significant number of states refuse to permit secondary trading in our common stock, the liquidity for the common stock could be significantly impacted.

 

We do not expect to pay dividends in the future. As a result, any return on investment may be limited to the value of our common stock.

 

We do not anticipate paying cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. The payment of dividends on our common stock will depend on our earnings, financial condition and other business and economic factors as our board of directors may consider relevant. If we do not pay dividends, our common stock may be less valuable because a return on your investment will only occur if our stock price appreciates.

 

Because we became a public company by means of a "reverse merger," we may not be able to attract the attention of major brokerage firms and we will also be subject to a one-year "seasoning period" before we will be permitted to list our securities on a securities exchange.

 

Additional risks may exist since we became public through a "reverse merger." Securities analysts of major brokerage firms may not provide coverage of our securities since there is little incentive to brokerage firms to recommend the purchase of our common stock. No assurance can be given that brokerage firms will want to conduct any secondary offerings on our behalf in the future. In addition, companies that become public through a "reverse takeover" are not permitted to list their securities on a securities exchange until (i) the company has completed a one-year "seasoning period" by trading in the United States over-the-counter market or on another regulated United States or foreign exchange following the reverse merger, and filed all required reports with the SEC, including audited financial statements, and (ii) the company maintains the requisite minimum share price for a sustained period, and for at least 30 of the 60 trading days, immediately prior to its listing application and the exchange's decision to list.

 

 
20
 

 

The market for penny stocks has experienced numerous frauds and abuses, which could adversely impact investors in our stock.

 

Securities quoted on the over-the-counter markets like the OTCQB maintained by OTCMarkets, Inc. are frequent targets of fraud or market manipulation, both because of their generally low prices and because there are limited reporting requirements for over-the-counter traded securities than those of the stock exchanges or NASDAQ. Patterns of fraud and abuse include:

 

·

Control of the market for the security by one or a few broker-dealers that are often related to the promoter or issuer;

 

 

 

·

Manipulation of prices through prearranged matching of purchases and sales and false and misleading press releases;

 

 

 

·

"Boiler room" practices involving high pressure sales tactics and unrealistic price projections by inexperienced sales persons;

 

 

 

·

Excessive and undisclosed bid-ask differentials and markups by selling broker-dealers; and

 

 

 

·

Wholesale dumping of the same securities by promoters and broker-dealers after prices have been manipulated to a desired level, along with the inevitable collapse of those prices with consequent investor losses.

 

Our management is aware of the abuses that have occurred historically in the penny stock market.

 

Risks Related to Our Medical Diagnostic Testing Business and Strategy

 

We may not be successful in transitioning from our existing product portfolio to our new products. We may not be able to generate sufficient revenue from our existing tests and our new tests or develop new tests to maintain profitability.

 

We believe our future success is dependent upon our ability to successfully market our existing molecular diagnostic tests to additional patients within the United States, to expand into new markets outside the United States, and to develop and commercialize new molecular diagnostic and companion diagnostic tests.

 

For example, because most of our molecular diagnostic tests are only utilized once per patient, we will need to sell our services through physicians to new patients or develop new molecular diagnostic tests in order to continue to generate revenue. Our pipeline of new molecular diagnostic and companion diagnostic test candidates is in various stages of development and may take several more years to develop and must undergo extensive clinical validation. We may be unable to discover or develop any additional molecular diagnostic or companion diagnostic tests through the utilization of our technologies or technologies we license or acquire from others. Even if we develop tests or services for commercial use, we may not be able to develop tests or services that:

 

·

meet applicable regulatory standards, in a timely manner or at all;

 

 

 

·

successfully compete with other technologies and tests;

 

 

 

·

avoid infringing the proprietary rights of others;

 

 

 

·

are adequately reimbursed by third-party payors;

 

 

 

·

can be performed at commercial levels or at reasonable cost; or

 

 

 

·

can be successfully marketed.

 

We must generate significant revenue to maintain profitability. Even if we succeed in our existing molecular diagnostic tests to physicians for use in new patients and in developing and commercializing any additional molecular diagnostic tests and companion diagnostic tests, we may not be able to generate sufficient revenue and we may not be able to maintain profitability.

 

We may not become profitable on a quarterly or annual basis.

 

In order to develop and commercialize our molecular diagnostic and companion diagnostic test candidates, we expect to incur significant expenses over the next several years as we increase our research and development activities, expand clinical validation trials for our molecular diagnostic tests and companion diagnostic tests currently in development, potentially license or acquire additional companies or technologies and engage in commercialization activities in anticipation of the launch of additional molecular diagnostic tests companion diagnostic tests. Because of the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with developing our tests and their potential for commercialization, we are unable to predict the extent of any future profits. If we are unable to sustain or increase profitability, the market value of our common stock will likely decline. Our ability to maintain profitability will depend upon numerous factors, including:

 

·

our ability to transition from our existing product portfolio to our new products and to commercialize these new tests;

 

 

 

·

our ability to obtain full or partial reimbursement for new products;

 

 

 

·

our ability to sell our other existing molecular diagnostic tests to new patients;

 

 

 

·

our ability to identify biomarkers that may lead to future molecular diagnostic tests and companion diagnostic tests;

 

 

 

·

our ability to develop test candidates and receive any required regulatory approvals;

 

 

 

·

our ability to successfully commercialize our tests in our existing markets and to extend into new markets outside the United States;

 

 

 

·

the approval and introduction of competitive tests;

 

 

 

·

reductions in reimbursement by third-party payors or their willingness to provide full or even partial reimbursement for our tests;

 

 

 

·

our ability to maintain and enforce our intellectual property rights covering our molecular diagnostic tests and companion diagnostic tests;

 

 

 

·

our ability to maintain and grow our sales force and marketing team to market our tests;

 

 

 

·

our ability to successfully integrate, develop and grow products and services and the business of any other companies or technologies that we may license or acquire;

 

 

 

·

our ability to increase commercial acceptance of our current molecular diagnostic tests; and

 

 

 

·

our ability to maintain or grow our current revenues.

 

 
21
 

 

If we cannot successfully launch our molecular diagnostic tests and are unable to secure additional funding, we may have to exit the market place.

 

To develop and bring new molecular diagnostic tests and companion diagnostic tests to market, we must commit substantial resources to costly and time-consuming research, development testing and clinical testing. If we are unable to secure adequate funding, we may be required to reduce research and development projects, limit sales and marketing activities, reduce headcount or potentially even discontinue operations. Our future capital requirements will depend on many factors that are currently unknown to us, including:

 

·

our ability to maintain the existing licenses to our molecular diagnostic tests and enter into collaborations, licensing or other arrangements favorable to us;

 

 

 

·

the scope, progress, results and cost of development, clinical testing and pre-market studies of any new molecular diagnostic tests that we may discover or acquire;

 

 

 

·

the progress, results, and costs to develop additional molecular diagnostic tests;

 

 

 

·

the costs by us or our licensors of preparing, filing and prosecuting patent applications, maintaining and enforcing our current issued patents, and defending intellectual property-related claims;

 

 

 

·

the costs of acquiring technologies or businesses, and our ability to successfully integrate and achieve the expected benefits of our business development activities and acquisitions;

 

 

 

·

the progress, cost and results of our international expansion efforts;

 

 

 

·

the costs of expanding our sales and marketing functions and commercial operation facilities in the United States and in new markets;

 

 

 

·

the costs, timing and outcome of any litigation against us; and

 

 

 

·

the costs to satisfy our current and future obligations.

 

We may acquire technologies, assets or other businesses that could cause us to incur significant expense and expose us to a number of unanticipated operational and financial risks.

 

In addition to organic growth, we intend to continue to pursue growth through the acquisition of technology, assets or other businesses that may enable us to enhance our technologies and capabilities, expand our geographic market, add experienced management personnel and increase our test offerings. However, these acquisitions may not achieve profitability or generate a positive return on our investment. Additionally, we may be unable to implement our growth strategy if we cannot identify suitable acquisition candidates, reach agreement on potential acquisitions on acceptable terms, successfully integrate personnel or assets that we acquire or for other reasons. Our acquisition efforts may involve certain risks, including:

 

·

we may have difficulty integrating operations and systems;

 

 

 

·

key personnel and customers of the acquired company may terminate their relationships with the acquired company as a result of the acquisition;

 

 

 

·

we may not be successful in launching new molecular diagnostic tests or companion diagnostic tests, or if those tests are launched they may not prove successful in the market place;

 

 

 

·

we may experience additional financial and accounting challenges and complexities in areas such as tax planning and financial reporting;

 

 

 

·

we may assume or be held liable for risks and liabilities, including for environmental-related costs, as a result of our acquisitions, some of which we may not discover during our due diligence;

 

 

 

·

we may incur significant additional operating expenses;

 

 

 

·

our ongoing business may be disrupted or receive insufficient management attention; and

 

 

 

·

we may not be able to realize synergies, the cost savings or other financial and operational benefits we anticipated, or such synergies, savings or benefits may take longer than we expected.

 

The process of negotiating acquisitions and integrating acquired tests, services, technologies, personnel or businesses might result in operating difficulties and expenditures and might require significant management attention that would otherwise be available for ongoing development of our business, whether or not any such transaction is ever consummated. Moreover, we might never realize the anticipated benefits of any acquisition. Future acquisitions could result in the use of our available cash and marketable securities, potentially dilutive issuances of equity securities, the incurrence of debt, contingent liabilities, or impairment expenses related to goodwill, and impairment or amortization expenses related to other intangible assets, which could harm our financial condition. In addition, if we are unable to integrate any acquired businesses, tests or technologies effectively, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be materially adversely affected.

 

 
22
 

 

We may not be able to successfully integrate the operations of businesses that we acquire with our own or realize the anticipated benefits of the acquisitions, which could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and business prospects.

 

There can be no assurance that we will be able to successfully integrate acquisitions or develop or commercialize products based on acquired technologies, or that we will be able to successfully integrate any other companies, products or technologies that we may acquire and may not realize all or any of the expected benefits of any future acquisitions as and when planned. Additionally, we may experience increased expenses, distraction of our management, personnel and customer uncertainty.

 

The difficulties and risks associated with the integration of any other businesses that we may acquire include:

 

·

possible inconsistencies in the standards, controls, procedures, policies and compensation structures;

 

 

 

·

the increased scope and complexity of the acquired company's operations;

 

 

 

·

the potential loss of key employees and the costs associated to retain key employees;

 

 

 

·

risks and limitations on our ability to consolidate corporate and administrative infrastructures of the two companies; and

 

 

 

·

the possibility of unanticipated delays, costs or inefficiencies associated with the integration of our operations with the operations of any other companies that we may acquire.

 

As a result of these difficulties and risks, we may not accomplish the integration of the business of any companies we may acquire smoothly, successfully or within our budgetary expectations and anticipated timetable. Accordingly, we may fail to realize some or all of the anticipated benefits of the acquisition, such as increase in our scale, diversification, cash flows and operational efficiency and meaningful accretion to our diluted earnings per share.

 

If we were successfully sued for product liability, we could face substantial liabilities that exceed our resources.

 

Our business exposes us to potential liability risks inherent in the testing, marketing and processing of molecular diagnostic products, including possible misdiagnoses. Although we are insured against such risks in amounts that we believe to be commercially reasonable, our present professional and product liability insurance may be inadequate. A successful product liability claim in excess of our insurance coverage could have a material adverse effect on our business. Any successful product liability claim may prevent us from obtaining adequate product liability insurance in the future on commercially desirable or reasonable terms. An inability to obtain sufficient insurance coverage at an acceptable cost or otherwise to protect against potential product liability claims could prevent or inhibit the commercialization of our products.

 

We are dependent on our information technology and telecommunications systems, and any failure of these systems could harm our business.

 

We depend on information technology, or IT, and telecommunications systems for significant aspects of our business. These IT and telecommunications systems support a variety of functions, including sample processing, tracking, quality control, customer service and support, billing, research and development activities, and various general and administrative activities. Failures or significant downtime of our IT or telecommunications systems could prevent us from processing samples, providing test results to physicians, billing payors, addressing patient or physician inquiries, conducting research and development activities and conducting general and administrative elements of our business. Any disruption or loss of IT or telecommunications systems on which critical aspects of our operations depend could have an adverse effect on our business.

 

Security breaches, loss of data and other disruptions could compromise sensitive information related to our business, prevent us from accessing critical information or expose us to liability, which could adversely affect our business and our reputation.

 

In the ordinary course of our business, we collect and store sensitive data, including legally protected patient health information, credit card information, personally identifiable information about our employees, intellectual property, and proprietary business information. We manage and maintain our applications and data utilizing on-site systems. These applications and data encompass a wide variety of business critical information including research and development information, commercial information and business and financial information.

 

 
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The secure processing, storage, maintenance and transmission of this critical information is vital to our operations and business strategy, and we devote significant resources to protecting such information. Although we take measures to protect sensitive information from unauthorized access or disclosure, our information technology and infrastructure may be vulnerable to attacks by hackers, or viruses, breaches or interruptions due to employee error, malfeasance or other disruptions, or lapses in compliance with privacy and security mandates. Any such virus, breach or interruption could compromise our networks and the information stored there could be accessed by unauthorized parties, publicly disclosed, lost or stolen. We have measures in place that are designed to detect and respond to such security incidents and breaches of privacy and security mandates. Any such access, disclosure or other loss of information could result in legal claims or proceedings, liability under laws that protect the privacy of personal information, such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, government enforcement actions and regulatory penalties. Unauthorized access, loss or dissemination could also disrupt our operations, including our ability to process samples, provide test results, bill payors or patients, provide customer support services, conduct research and development activities, process and prepare company financial information, manage various general and administrative aspects of our business and damage our reputation, any of which could adversely affect our business.

 

If our current operating plan changes and we find that our existing capital resources will not meet our needs, we may find it necessary to raise additional funding, which may not be available.

 

We anticipate that our existing capital resources and expected net cash to be generated from sales of our molecular diagnostic tests will enable us to maintain our currently planned operations for the foreseeable future. However, we base this expectation on our current operating plan, which may change. We have incurred, and will continue to incur, significant costs in the discovery, development and marketing of current and prospective molecular diagnostic and companion diagnostic tests. Our ongoing efforts to develop tests and expand our business which may be through internally developed products, in licensing and mergers and acquisitions, will require substantial cash resources. If, due to changes in our current operating plan, adequate funds are not available, we may be required to raise additional funds. Sources of potential additional capital resources may include, but are not limited to, public or private equity financings, establishing a credit facility, or selling convertible debt securities. This additional funding, if necessary, may not be available to us on reasonable terms, or at all. If we issue shares of stock or other securities to acquire new companies or technologies, the ownership interests of our existing stockholders may be significantly diluted.

 

Because of our potential long-term capital requirements, we may access the public or private equity or debt markets whenever conditions are favorable, even if we do not have an immediate need for additional capital at that time. If additional funds are raised by issuing equity securities, existing stockholders may suffer significant dilution. Debt financing, if available, may involve agreements that include covenants limiting or restricting our ability to take specific actions, such as incurring debt, making capital expenditures or declaring dividends. If we raise additional funds through collaborations, strategic alliances and licensing arrangements with third parties, we may have to relinquish valuable rights to our technologies or tests, or grant licenses on terms that are not favorable to us.

 

Our business involves environmental risks that may result in liability for us.

 

In connection with our research and development activities, we are subject to federal, state and local laws, rules, regulations and policies governing the use, generation, manufacture, storage, air emission, effluent discharge, handling and disposal of certain materials, biological specimens, chemicals and wastes. Although we believe that we have complied with the applicable laws, regulations and policies in all material respects and have not been required to correct any material noncompliance, we may be required to incur significant costs to comply with environmental and health and safety regulations in the future. Although we believe that our safety procedures for handling and disposing of controlled materials comply with the standards prescribed by state and federal regulations, accidental contamination or injury from these materials may occur. In the event of such an occurrence, we could be held liable for any damages that result and any such liability could exceed our resources.

 

Changes in healthcare policy could increase our costs, decrease our revenues and impact sales of and reimbursement for our tests.

 

In March 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Affordability Reconciliation Act, or the ACA became law. This law substantially changes the way health care is financed by both governmental and private insurers, and significantly impacts our industry. The ACA contains a number of provisions that are expected to impact our business and operations, some of which in ways we cannot currently predict, including those governing enrollment in federal healthcare programs, reimbursement changes and fraud and abuse, which will impact existing government healthcare programs and will result in the development of new programs.

 

In addition to the ACA, there will continue to be proposals by legislators at both the federal and state levels, regulators and third-party payors to reduce costs while expanding individual healthcare benefits. Certain of these changes could impose additional limitations on the prices we will be able to charge for our tests or the amounts of reimbursement available for our tests from governmental agencies or third-party payors.

 

 
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Risks Related to Commercialization of Our Tests, Our Services and Test Candidates

 

We may not be able to generate revenue on commercialized diagnostic technology.

 

Potential events or factors that may have a significant impact on our ability to generate revenue for our molecular diagnostic business include the following:

 

·

increased costs of reagents and other consumables required for molecular diagnostic testing;

 

 

 

·

increased licensing or royalty costs, and our ability to maintain and enforce the intellectual property rights underlying our tests and services;

 

 

 

·

increased personnel and facility costs;

 

 

 

·

our inability to hire competent, trained staff, including laboratory directors required to review and approve all reports we issue in our molecular diagnostic business, and sales personnel;

 

 

 

·

our inability to obtain necessary equipment or reagents to perform molecular diagnostic testing;

 

 

 

·

our inability to increase production capacity as demand increases;

 

 

 

·

our inability to expand into new markets outside the United States;

 

 

 

·

the efforts of third party payors to limit or decrease the amounts that they are willing to pay for our tests;

 

 

 

·

changes in intellectual propriety law applicable to our patents or enforcement in the United States and foreign countries;

 

 

 

·

potential obsolescence of our tests;

 

 

 

·

our inability to increase commercial acceptance of our molecular diagnostic tests;

 

 

 

·

increased competition and loss of market share; and

 

 

 

·

increased regulatory requirements.

 

We may experience increased price competition and price erosion, including price decreases from CMS and private payors.

 

CMS has recently reduced the reimbursement rate for some of our products and as a result we may experience pricing pressures from managed care organizations and other third-party payors. Any declines in average selling prices of our products due to pricing pressures may have an adverse impact on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Our pharmaceutical testing services customers may reduce the amount of testing they conduct through us.

 

If there is a change in the regulatory environment or intellectual property law, or our pharmaceutical testing services customers consolidate, our customers may divert resources from testing, resulting in a reduced demand for our laboratory testing services. Alternatively, customers may decide to perform their own laboratory testing services in-house.

 

We rely on a single laboratory facility to process each of our molecular diagnostic tests in the United States and a single laboratory facility to perform our clinical services. Failure to maintain the operations of these laboratories in compliance with applicable regulations would seriously harm our business.

 

We are relying on Docro, Inc. to provide samples for testing and to oversee the testing procedure. Docro has close relationships with the FDA. Docro has access to all of the samples required to do all of the requisite FDA submissions. We are relying on Arrayit, Inc. to perform the FDA validation testing, which Docro will supervise. After initial FDA approval, Arrayit may initially manufacture the tests. Should the Company or OvaDx be purchased or licensed by another company, manufacturing will pass to the purchaser. There are no other major vendors.

 

We depend on a limited number of third parties for some of our supplies of equipment and reagents. If these supplies become unavailable, then we may not be able to successfully perform our research or operate our business on a timely basis or at all.

 

We currently rely on a small number of suppliers to provide our gene sequencing equipment, content enrichment equipment, multiplex protein analysis equipment, robots, and specialty reagents and laboratory supplies required in connection with our research. We believe that currently there are limited alternative suppliers of these equipment, robots, and reagents. The equipment, robots, or the reagents may not remain available in commercial quantities at acceptable costs. If we are unable to obtain when needed additional or alternative equipment, robots, or an adequate supply of reagents or other ingredients at commercially reasonable rates, our ability to continue to identify genes and perform molecular diagnostic testing and pharmaceutical and clinical services would be adversely affected.

 

If we do not compete effectively with scientific and commercial competitors, we may not be able to successfully commercialize our tests.

 

The clinical laboratory and genetics testing fields are intense and highly competitive. Tests that are developed are characterized by rapid technological change. Our competitors in the United States and abroad are numerous and include, among others, major diagnostic companies, reference laboratories, molecular diagnostic firms, universities and other research institutions. Some of our potential competitors have considerably greater financial, technical, marketing and other resources than we do, which may allow these competitors to discover important genes and determine their function before we do. We could be adversely affected if we do not discover genes, proteins or biomarkers and characterize their function, develop molecular diagnostic and pharmaceutical and clinical services based on these discoveries, obtain required regulatory and other approvals and launch these tests and their related services before our competitors. We also expect to encounter significant competition with respect to any molecular diagnostic and companion diagnostic tests that we may develop or commercialize. Those companies that bring to market new molecular diagnostic and companion tests before we do may achieve a significant competitive advantage in marketing and commercializing their tests. We may not be able to develop additional molecular diagnostic tests successfully and we or our licensors may not obtain or enforce patents covering these tests that provide protection against our competitors. Moreover, our competitors may succeed in developing molecular diagnostic and companion diagnostic tests that circumvent our technologies or tests. Furthermore, our competitors may succeed in developing technologies or tests that are more effective or less costly than those developed by us or that would render our technologies or tests less competitive or obsolete. We expect competition to intensify in the fields in which we are involved as technical advances in these fields occur and become more widely known and changes in intellectual property laws generate challenges to our intellectual property position.

 

 
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If our current research collaborators or scientific advisors terminate their relationships with us or develop relationships with a competitor, our ability to discover genes, proteins, and biomarkers, and to validate and commercialize molecular diagnostic and companion diagnostic tests could be adversely affected.

 

We have relationships with research collaborators at academic and other institutions who conduct research at our request. These research collaborators are not our employees. As a result, we have limited control over their activities and, except as otherwise required by our collaboration agreements, can expect only limited amounts of their time to be dedicated to our activities. Our ability to discover genes, proteins, and biomarkers involved in human disease and validate and commercialize molecular diagnostic and companion diagnostic tests will depend in part on the continuation of these collaborations. If any of these collaborations are terminated, we may not be able to enter into other acceptable collaborations. In addition, our existing collaborations may not be successful.

 

Our research collaborators and scientific advisors may have relationships with other commercial entities, some of which could compete with us. Our research collaborators and scientific advisors sign agreements which provide for the confidentiality of our proprietary information and the results of studies conducted at our request. We may not, however, be able to maintain the confidentiality of our technology and other confidential information related to all collaborations. The dissemination of our confidential information could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

If we fail to retain our key personnel and hire, train and retain qualified employees and consultants, we may not be able to successfully continue our business.

 

Because of the specialized scientific nature of our business, we are highly dependent upon our ability to attract and retain qualified management, scientific and technical personnel. We are currently recruiting additional qualified management, scientific and technical personnel. Competition for such personnel is intense. Loss of the services of or failure to recruit additional key management, scientific and technical personnel would adversely affect our research and development programs and molecular diagnostic and pharmaceutical and clinical services business and may have a material adverse effect on our business as a whole.

 

Our agreements with our employees generally provide for employment that can be terminated by either party without cause at any time, subject to specified notice requirements. Further, the non-competition provision to which each employee is subject expires for certain key employees on the applicable date of termination of employment.

 

As we expand our commercial tests we may be required to incur significant costs and devote significant efforts to expand our existing tests sales and marketing capabilities.

 

Our sales and marketing experience and capabilities consist primarily of our sales force that markets our cancer-related molecular diagnostic tests to oncologists, Ob/Gyns and urologists in the United States. We are currently expanding our sales efforts outside the United States, which will require us to hire additional personnel and engage in additional sales and marketing efforts. We have limited sales and marketing experience outside the Unites States. As we expand our business operations internationally, we expect to face a number of additional costs and risks, including the need to recruit a large number of additional experienced marketing and sales personnel.

 

Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property

 

If we are not able to protect our proprietary technology, others could compete against us more directly, which would harm our business.

 

Our commercial success will depend, in part, on our ability to obtain additional patents and licenses and protect our existing patent position, both in the United States and in other countries. Our ability to preserve our trade secrets and other intellectual property is also important to our long-term success. If we do not adequately protect our intellectual property, competitors may be able to use our technologies and erode or negate any competitive advantage we may have, which could harm our business and ability to maintain profitability. Patents may also issue to third parties which could interfere with our ability to bring our molecular diagnostic tests to market. The laws of some foreign countries do not protect our proprietary rights to the same extent as U.S. laws, and we may encounter significant problems in protecting our proprietary rights in these countries.

 

The patent positions of diagnostic companies, including our patent position, are generally highly uncertain and involve complex legal and factual questions, and, therefore, any patents issued to us may be challenged, deemed unenforceable, invalidated or circumvented. We will be able to protect our proprietary rights from unauthorized use by third parties only to the extent that our proprietary technologies and any future tests are covered by valid and enforceable patents or are effectively maintained as trade secrets. Our patent applications may never issue as patents, and the claims of any issued patents may not afford meaningful protection for our technology or tests. In addition, any patents issued to us or our licensors may be challenged, and subsequently narrowed, invalidated or circumvented.

 

 
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Where necessary, we may initiate litigation to enforce our patent or other intellectual property rights. Any such litigation may require us to spend a substantial amount of time and money and could distract management from our day-to-day operations. Moreover, there is no assurance that we will be successful in any such litigation.

 

The degree of future protection for our proprietary rights is uncertain, and we cannot ensure that:

 

·

we or our licensors were the first to make the inventions covered by each of our patent applications;

 

 

 

·

we or our licensors were the first to file patent applications for these inventions;

 

 

 

·

others will not independently develop similar or alternative technologies or duplicate any of our technologies;

 

 

 

·

any of our or our licensors' patent applications will result in issued patents;

 

 

 

·

any of our or our licensors' patents will be valid or enforceable;

 

 

 

·

any patents issued to us or our licensors and collaborators will provide a basis for commercially viable tests, will provide us with any competitive advantages or will not be challenged by third parties;

 

 

 

·

we will develop additional proprietary technologies or tests that are patentable;

 

 

 

·

the patents of others will not have an adverse effect on our business; or

 

 

 

·

our patents or patents that we license from others will survive legal challenges, and remain valid and enforceable.

 

If a third party files a patent application with claims to a biomarker we have discovered, the PTO may declare interference between competing patent applications. If an interference is declared, we may not prevail in the interference. If the other party prevails in the interference, we may be precluded from commercializing services or tests based on the biomarker or may be required to seek a license. A license may not be available to us on commercially acceptable terms, if at all.

 

We also rely upon unpatented proprietary technologies. Although we require employees, consultants and collaborators to sign confidentiality agreements, we may not be able to adequately protect our rights in such unpatented proprietary technologies, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. For example, others may independently develop substantially equivalent proprietary information or techniques or otherwise gain access to our proprietary technologies or disclose our technologies to our competitors.

 

If we were sued for patent infringement by third parties, we might incur significant costs and delays in test introduction.

 

Our tests may also conflict with patents that have been or may be granted to others. Our industry includes many organizations that have or are seeking to discern biomarkers and develop genomic, proteomic and other technologies. To the extent any patents are issued or have been issued to those organizations, the risk increases that the sale of our molecular diagnostic and companion diagnostic tests currently being marketed or under development may give rise to claims of patent infringement. Others may have filed and in the future are likely to file patent applications covering biomarkers that are similar or identical to our tests. Any of these patent applications may have priority over our patent applications and these entities or persons could bring legal proceedings against us seeking damages or seeking to enjoin us from testing or marketing our tests. Patent litigation is costly, and even if we prevail, the cost of such litigation could have a material adverse effect on us. If the other parties in any such actions are successful, in addition to any liability for damages, we could be required to cease the infringing activity or obtain a license. Any license required may not be available to us on commercially acceptable terms, if at all. Our failure to obtain a license to any technology that we may require to commercialize our tests could have a material adverse effect on our business. We believe that there may be significant litigation in the industry regarding patent and other intellectual property rights. If we become involved in this litigation, it could consume a substantial portion of our managerial and financial resources.

 

We may be unable to adequately prevent disclosure of trade secrets, proprietary databases, and other proprietary information.

 

We rely on trade secrets to protect our proprietary technologies and databases, especially where we do not believe patent protection is appropriate or obtainable. However, trade secrets are difficult to protect. We rely in part on confidentiality agreements with our employees, consultants, outside scientific collaborators, sponsored researchers and others to protect our trade secrets and other proprietary information. These agreements may not effectively prevent disclosure of confidential information and may not provide an adequate remedy if unauthorized disclosure of confidential information occurs. In addition, others may independently discover our trade secrets and proprietary information. Costly and time-consuming litigation could be necessary to enforce and determine the scope of our proprietary rights, and failure to obtain or maintain trade secret protection could adversely affect our competitive position.

 

If we fail to comply with our obligations under license or technology agreements with third parties, we could lose license rights that are critical to our business.

 

We license intellectual property that is critical to our business, including licenses underlying the technology in our molecular diagnostic and pharmaceutical and clinical services, and in the future we may enter into additional agreements that provide us with licenses to valuable intellectual property or technology. These licenses impose various royalty payments, milestones, and other obligations on us. If we fail to comply with any of these obligations, the licensor may have the right to terminate the license. Termination by the licensor would cause us to lose valuable rights, and could prevent us from distributing our current tests, or inhibit our ability to commercialize future test candidates. Our business would suffer if any current or future licenses terminate, if the licensors fail to abide by the terms of the license, if the licensors fail to prevent infringement by third parties, if the licensed patents or other rights are found to be invalid or unenforceable, or if we are unable to enter into necessary licenses on acceptable terms.

 

 
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We may be subject to claims that we or our employees have wrongfully used or disclosed alleged trade secrets of their former employers.

 

As is commonplace in our industry, we employ individuals who were previously employed at other biotechnology or pharmaceutical companies, including our potential competitors. Although no claims against us are currently pending, we may be subject to claims that these employees have inadvertently or otherwise used or disclosed trade secrets or other proprietary information of their former employers. Litigation may be necessary to defend against these claims. Even if we are successful in defending against these claims, litigation could result in substantial costs and be a distraction to management.

 

Risks Related to Government Regulation

 

If we fail to comply with the complex federal, state, local and foreign laws and regulations that apply to our business, we could suffer severe consequences that could materially and adversely affect our operating results and financial condition.

 

Our operations are subject to extensive federal, state, local and foreign laws and regulations, all of which are subject to change. These laws and regulations currently include, among other things:

 

·

CLIA, which requires that laboratories obtain certification from the federal government;

 

 

 

·

FDA laws and regulations;

 

 

 

·

HIPAA, which established comprehensive federal standards with respect to the privacy and security of protected health information and requirements for the use of certain standardized electronic transactions; amendments to HIPAA under the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act, or HITECH, which strengthen and expand HIPAA privacy and security compliance requirements, increase penalties for violators, extend enforcement authority to state attorneys general and impose requirements for breach notification;

 

 

 

·

state laws regulating genetic testing and protecting the privacy of genetic test results, as well as state laws protecting the privacy and security of health information and personal data and mandating reporting of breaches to affected individuals and state regulators;

 

 

 

·

the federal anti-kickback law, or the Anti-Kickback Statute, which prohibits knowingly and willfully offering, paying, soliciting, receiving, or providing remuneration, directly or indirectly, in exchange for or to induce either the referral of an individual, or the furnishing, arranging for, or recommending of an item or service that is reimbursable, in whole or in part, by a federal health care program;

 

 

 

·

the federal False Claims Act, which imposes liability on any person or entity that, among other things, knowingly presents, or causes to be presented, a false or fraudulent claim for payment to the federal government;

 

 

 

·

the federal Civil Monetary Penalties Law, which prohibits, among other things, the offering or transfer of remuneration to a Medicare or state health care program beneficiary if the person knows or should know it is likely to influence the beneficiary's selection of a particular provider, practitioner, or supplier of services reimbursable by Medicare or a state health care program, unless an exception applies;

 

 

 

·

other federal and state fraud and abuse laws, such as anti-kickback laws, prohibitions on self-referral, and false claims acts, which may extend to services reimbursable by any third-party payor, including private insurers; and

 

 

 

·

similar foreign laws and regulations that apply to us in the countries in which we operate.

 

These laws and regulations are complex and are subject to interpretation by the courts and by government agencies. Our failure to comply could lead to civil or criminal penalties, exclusion from participation in government health care programs, or prohibitions or restrictions on our laboratories' ability to provide services. We believe that we are in material compliance with all statutory and regulatory requirements, but there is a risk that one or more government agencies could take a contrary position, or that a private party could file suit under the qui tam provisions of the federal False Claims Act or a similar state law. Such occurrences, regardless of their outcome, could damage our reputation and adversely affect important business relationships with third parties, including managed care organizations, and other private third-party payors.

 

 
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Failure to comply with government laws and regulations related to submission of claims for our services could result in significant monetary damages and penalties and exclusion from the Medicare and Medicaid programs and corresponding foreign reimbursement programs.

 

We are subject to laws and regulations governing the submission of claims for payment for our services, such as those relating to: coverage of our services under Medicare, Medicaid and other state, federal and foreign health care programs; the amounts that we may bill for our services; and the party to which we must submit claims. Our failure to comply with applicable laws and regulations could result in our inability to receive payment for our services or in attempts by government healthcare programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, to recover payments already made. Submission of claims in violation of these laws and regulations can result in recoupment of payments already received, substantial civil monetary penalties, and exclusion from government health care programs, and can subject us to liability under the federal False Claims Act and similar laws. The failure to report and return an overpayment to the Medicare or Medicaid program within 60 days of identifying its existence can give rise to liability under the False Claims Act. Further, a government agency could attempt to hold us liable for causing the improper submission of claims by another entity for services that we performed if we were found to have knowingly participated in the arrangement at issue.

 

Our business could be harmed by the loss, suspension, or other restriction on a license, certification, or accreditation, or by the imposition of a fine or penalties, under CLIA, its implementing regulations, or other state, federal and foreign laws and regulations affecting licensure or certification, or by future changes in these laws or regulations.

 

The diagnostic testing industry is subject to extensive laws and regulations, many of which have not been interpreted by the courts. CLIA requires virtually all laboratories to be certified by the federal government and mandates compliance with various operational, personnel, facilities administration, quality and proficiency testing requirements intended to ensure that testing services are accurate, reliable and timely. CLIA certification is also a prerequisite to be eligible to bill state and federal health care programs, as well as many private third-party payors, for laboratory testing services. As a condition of CLIA certification, each of our laboratories is subject to survey and inspection every other year, in addition to being subject to additional random inspections. The biennial survey is conducted by CMS; a CMS agent (typically a state agency); or, if the laboratory holds a CLIA certificate of accreditation, a CMS-approved accreditation organization. Sanction for failure to comply with CLIA requirements, including proficiency testing violations, may be suspension, revocation, or limitation of a laboratory's CLIA certificate, which is necessary to conduct business, as well as the imposition of significant fines or criminal penalties. In addition, we are subject to regulation under state laws and regulations governing laboratory licensure. Some states have enacted state licensure laws that are more stringent than CLIA. We are also subject to laws and regulations governing our reference laboratory in Germany. Changes in state or foreign licensure laws that affect our ability to offer and provide diagnostic services across state or foreign country lines could materially and adversely affect our business. In addition, state and foreign requirements for laboratory certification may be costly or difficult to meet and could affect our ability to receive specimens from certain states or foreign countries.

 

Any sanction imposed under CLIA, its implementing regulations, or state or foreign laws or regulations governing licensure, or our failure to renew a CLIA certificate, a state or foreign license, or accreditation, could have a material adverse effect on our business. If the CLIA certificate of any one of our laboratories is revoked, CMS could seek revocation of the CLIA certificates of our other laboratories based on their common ownership or operation, even though they are separately certified.

 

Changes in the way that the FDA regulates tests performed by laboratories like ours could result in delay or additional expense in offering our tests and tests that we may develop in the future.

 

While the FDA does not currently regulate the activities or tests performed by laboratories like our clinical laboratories, the FDA has stated that it has the right to do so If pre-market review is required, our business could be negatively impacted if we are required to stop selling molecular diagnostic tests pending their clearance or approval or the launch of any new tests that we develop could be delayed by new requirements.

 

Companion diagnostic tests require FDA approval and we may not be able to secure such approval in a timely manner or at all.

 

Our companion diagnostic products, marketing, sales and development activities and manufacturing processes are subject to extensive and rigorous regulation by the FDA pursuant to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FDC Act), by comparable agencies in foreign countries, and by other regulatory agencies and governing bodies. Under the FDC Act, companion diagnostics must receive FDA clearance or approval before they can be commercially marketed in the U.S. The process of obtaining marketing approval or clearance from the FDA or by comparable agencies in foreign countries for new products could:

 

·

take a significant period of time;

 

 

 

·

require the expenditure of substantial resources:

 

 

 

·

involve rigorous pre-clinical testing, as well as increased post-market surveillance:

 

 

 

·

require changes to products; and

 

 

 

·

result in limitations on the indicated uses of products.

 

 
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If the government and third-party payors fail to provide coverage and adequate payment for our tests and future tests, if any, our revenue and prospects for profitability will be harmed.

 

In both domestic and foreign markets, sales of our molecular diagnostic tests or any future diagnostic tests will depend in large part, upon the availability of reimbursement from third-party payors. Such third-party payors include government healthcare programs such as Medicare, managed care providers, private health insurers and other organizations. These third-party payors are increasingly attempting to contain healthcare costs by demanding price discounts or rebates and limiting both coverage on which diagnostic tests they will pay for and the amounts that they will pay for new molecular diagnostic tests. We have recently experienced price reductions from CMS for some of our products and may experience future price reductions from managed care organizations and other third-party payors. The fact that a diagnostic test has been approved for reimbursement in the past, for any particular indication or in any particular jurisdiction, does not guarantee that such a diagnostic test will remain approved for reimbursement or that similar or additional diagnostic tests will be approved in the future. As a result, third-party payors may not cover or provide adequate payment for our current or future molecular diagnostic tests. Adequate third-party reimbursement might not be available to enable us to maintain price levels sufficient to realize an appropriate return on investment in product development.

 

U.S. and foreign governments continue to propose and pass legislation designed to reduce the cost of healthcare. For example, in some foreign markets, the government controls the pricing of many healthcare products. We expect that there will continue to be federal and state proposals to implement governmental controls or impose healthcare requirements. In addition, the Medicare program and increasing emphasis on managed care in the United States will continue to put pressure on product pricing. Cost control initiatives could decrease the price that we would receive for any tests in the future, which would limit our revenue and profitability.

 

Risks Related to Our Common Stock

 

We lack an established trading market for our common stock, and you may be unable to sell your common stock at attractive prices or at all.

 

There is currently a limited trading market for our common stock in the OTCQB under the symbol "AVDX." There can be no assurances given that an established public market will be obtained for our common stock or that any public market will last. As a result, we cannot assure you that you will be able to sell your common stock at attractive prices or at all.

 

The market price for our common stock may be highly volatile.

 

The market price for our common stock may be highly volatile. A variety of factors may have a significant impact on the market price of our common stock, including:

 

·

the publication of earnings estimates or other research reports and speculation in the press or investment community;

 

 

 

·

changes in our industry and competitors;

 

 

 

·

our financial condition, results of operations and prospects;

 

 

 

·

any future issuances of our common stock, which may include primary offerings for cash, and the grant or exercise of stock options from time to time;

 

 

 

·

general market and economic conditions; and

 

 

 

·

any outbreak or escalation of hostilities, which could cause a recession or downturn in our economy.

 

We may be subject to stockholder litigation, thereby diverting our resources that may have a material effect on our profitability and results of operations.

 

As discussed in the preceding risk factors, the market for our common shares is characterized by significant price volatility when compared to seasoned issuers, and we expect that our share price will continue to be more volatile than a seasoned issuer for the indefinite future. In the past, plaintiffs have often initiated securities class action litigation against a company following periods of volatility in the market price of its securities. We may become the target of similar litigation. Securities litigation will result in substantial costs and liabilities and will divert management's attention and resources.

 

Our future sales of common stock by management and other stockholders may have an adverse effect on the then prevailing market price of our common stock.

 

In the event a public market for our common stock is sustained in the future, sales of our common stock may be made by holders of our public float or by holders of restricted securities in compliance with the provisions of Rule 144 of the Securities Act of 1933. In general, under Rule 144, a non-affiliated person who has satisfied a six-month holding period in a company registered under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, may, sell their restricted common stock without volume limitation, so long as the issuer is current with all reports under the Exchange Act in order for there to be adequate common public information. Affiliated persons may also sell their common shares held for at least six months, but affiliated persons will be required to meet certain other requirements, including manner of sale, notice requirements and volume limitations. Non-affiliated persons who hold their common shares for at least one year will be able to sell their common stock without the need for there to be current public information in the hands of the public. Future sales of shares of our public float or by restricted common stock made in compliance with Rule 144 may have an adverse effect on the then prevailing market price, if any, of our common stock.

 

 
30
 

 

Lack of Independent Directors.

 

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 requires us as a public corporation to have an audit committee composed solely of independent directors. Currently, we do not have an Audit Committee of the board of directors. Audit committee communications will have to go directly to board members and addressed with the board of directors. We can provide no assurances that we will be able to attract and maintain directors on our Board or form an Audit Committee in compliance with Sarbanes-Oxley.

 

We do not expect to pay dividends in the foreseeable future.

 

We do not anticipate paying cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. We may not have sufficient funds to legally pay dividends. Even if funds are legally available to pay dividends, we may nevertheless decide in our sole discretion not to pay dividends. The declaration, payment and amount of any future dividends will be made at the discretion of our board of directors, and will depend upon, among other things, the results of our operations, cash flows and financial condition, operating and capital requirements, and other factors our board of directors may consider relevant. There is no assurance that we will pay any dividends in the future, and, if dividends are paid, there is no assurance with respect to the amount of any such dividend.

 

As a public company, we are subject to complex legal and accounting requirements that will require us to incur significant expenses and will expose us to risk of non-compliance.

 

As a public company, we are subject to numerous legal and accounting requirements that do not apply to private companies. The cost of compliance with many of these requirements is material, not only in absolute terms but, more importantly, in relation to the overall scope of the operations of a small company. Our relative inexperience with these requirements may increase the cost of compliance and may also increase the risk that we will fail to comply. Failure to comply with these requirements can have numerous adverse consequences including, but not limited to, our inability to file required periodic reports on a timely basis, loss of market confidence and/or governmental or private actions against us. We cannot assure you that we will be able to comply with all of these requirements or that the cost of such compliance will not prove to be a substantial competitive disadvantage vis-à-vis our privately held and larger public competitors.

 

Compliance with changing regulation of corporate governance and public disclosure will result in additional expenses and pose challenges for our management.

 

Changing laws, regulations and standards relating to corporate governance and public disclosure, including the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and SEC regulations, have created uncertainty for public companies and significantly increased the costs and risks associated with accessing the U.S. public markets. Our management team will need to devote significant time and financial resources to comply with both existing and evolving standards for public companies, which will lead to increased general and administrative expenses and a diversion of management time and attention from revenue generating activities to compliance activities.

 

We are subject to penny stock regulations and restrictions and you may have difficulty selling shares of our common stock.

 

Our common stock is subject to the provisions of Section 15(g) and Rule 15g-9 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the "Exchange Act"), commonly referred to as the "penny stock rule." Section 15(g) sets forth certain requirements for transactions in penny stock, and Rule 15g-9(d) incorporates the definition of "penny stock" that is found in Rule 3a51-1 of the Exchange Act. The SEC generally defines a penny stock to be any equity security that has a market price less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions. We are subject to the SEC's penny stock rules.

 

Since our common stock is deemed to be penny stock, trading in the shares of our common stock is subject to additional sales practice requirements on broker-dealers who sell penny stock to persons other than established customers and accredited investors. "Accredited investors" are persons with assets in excess of $1,000,000 (excluding the value of such person's primary residence) or annual income exceeding $200,000 or $300,000 together with their spouse. For transactions covered by these rules, broker-dealers must make a special suitability determination for the purchase of such security and must have the purchaser's written consent to the transaction prior to the purchase. Additionally, for any transaction involving a penny stock, unless exempt the rules require the delivery, prior to the first transaction of a risk disclosure document, prepared by the SEC, relating to the penny stock market. A broker-dealer also must disclose the commissions payable to both the broker-dealer and the registered representative and current quotations for the securities. Finally, monthly statements must be sent disclosing recent price information for the penny stocks held in an account and information to the limited market in penny stocks. Consequently, these rules may restrict the ability of broker-dealer to trade and/or maintain a market in our common stock and may affect the ability of our stockholders to sell their shares of common stock.

 

There can be no assurance that our shares of common stock will qualify for exemption from the Penny Stock Rule. In any event, even if our common stock was exempt from the Penny Stock Rule, we would remain subject to Section 15(b)(6) of the Exchange Act, which gives the SEC the authority to restrict any person from participating in a distribution of penny stock if the SEC finds that such a restriction would be in the public interest.

 

 
31
 

 

Our common stock is subject to price volatility unrelated to our operations.

 

The market price of our common stock could fluctuate substantially due to a variety of factors, including market perception of our ability to achieve our planned growth, quarterly operating results of other companies in the same industry, trading volume in our common stock, changes in general conditions in the economy and the financial markets or other developments affecting our competitors or ourselves. In addition, the OTCQB is subject to extreme price and volume fluctuations in general. This volatility has had a significant effect on the market price of securities issued by many companies for reasons unrelated to their operating performance and could have the same effect on our common stock.

 

Trading in our common stock on the OTC Markets is limited and sporadic making it difficult for our stockholders to sell their shares or liquidate their investments.

 

Trading in our common stock is currently published on the OTC Markets. The trading price of our common stock has been subject to wide fluctuations. Trading prices of our common stock may fluctuate in response to a number of factors, many of which will be beyond our control. The stock market has generally experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of companies with no current business operation. There can be no assurance that trading prices and price earnings ratios previously experienced by our common stock will be matched or maintained. These broad market and industry factors may adversely affect the market price of our common stock, regardless of our operating performance. In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company's securities, securities class-action litigation has often been instituted. Such litigation, if instituted, could result in substantial costs for us and a diversion of management's attention and resources.

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.

 

Not Applicable.

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES.

 

As of September 30, 2015, the Company leases corporate office space on a month-to-month basis for $200 per month from an entity controlled by the Company's Chief Executive Officer. For the years ended September 30, 2015 and 2014, total rent expense was $2,400 and $1,800, respectively.

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.

 

In the normal course of business, the Company may be involved in legal proceedings, claims and assessments arising in the ordinary course of business. Such matters are subject to many uncertainties, and outcomes are not predictable with assurance. There are no such matters that are deemed material to the consolidated nancial statements as of September 30, 2015, except as discussed below.

 

On January 13, 2014, Plaintiff Tamarin Lindenberg sued Arrayit Corporation, the Company, John Howell, Steven Scott and Gregg Linn in Civil Action No. L7698-13. Plaintiff alleged violations of the New Jersey Conscientious Employee Protection Act NJSA 34:19-1 to NJSA 34:19-8 ("CEPA"), breach of contract, breach of covenant of good faith and fair dealing, economic duress and intentional infliction of emotional distress. On August 6, 2014 the District Court dismissed Plaintiff's complaint against Arrayit Corporation for failure to state a claim upon which relief may be granted and against John Howell for lack of jurisdiction. The Company and its officers remain as defendants in the action. The Company and its officers have mounted a fierce defense against these claims and believe they are without legal merit. 

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES.

 

Not applicable.

 

 
32
 

 

PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS, AND ISSUERS PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITES.

 

As of September 30, 2015, our common stock began trading on OTCQB Marketplace maintained by OTC Markets, Inc. under the symbol "AVDX." Prior to that date, our common stock was traded under the symbol "OREO." Prior to February 18, 2014, there was no public market for our common stock. The closing price of our common stock on OTCQB Marketplace on September 30, 2015 was $0.30 per share. The following table sets forth the range of high and low bid quotations as reported on the OTCQB for the periods indicated.

 

Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2015

 

High

 

 

Low

 

Quarter ended September 30, 2015

 

$0.50

 

 

$0.20

 

Quarter ended June 30, 2015

 

$1.65

 

 

$0.40

 

Quarter ended March 31, 2015

 

$1.73

 

 

$0.34

 

Quarter ended December 31, 2014

 

$0.59

 

 

$0.27

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2014

 

High

 

 

Low

 

Quarter ended September 30, 2014

 

$0.59

 

 

$0.09

 

Quarter ended June 30, 2014

 

$0.18

 

 

$0.14

 

Quarter ended March 31, 2014

 

$0.26

 

 

$0.12

 

Quarter ended December 31, 2013

 

$0.32

 

 

$0.15

 

 

Holders of Common Stock

 

As of September 30, 2015, we had 56 holders of record of our common stock.

 

Dividends

 

We have never paid any cash dividends on our common stock and do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. We currently intend to retain any future earnings to fund the development and growth of our business. There are no restrictions in our certificate of incorporation or by-laws on declaring dividends.

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities.

 

None.

 

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

Not Applicable.

 

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Forward-Looking Statements

 

This Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations includes a number of forward-looking statements that reflect Management's current views with respect to future events and financial performance. Forward-looking statements are projections in respect of future events or our future financial performance. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as "may", "should", "expects", "plans", "anticipates", "believes", "estimates", "predicts", "potential" or "continue" or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. Those statements include statements regarding the intent, belief or current expectations of us and members of our management team as well as the assumptions on which such statements are based. Prospective investors are cautioned that any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risk and uncertainties, and that actual results may differ materially from those contemplated by such forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements made in this annual report on Form 10-K includes statements about:

 

 

·

our plans to identify and acquire products that we believe will be prospective for acquisition and development;

 

 

 

 

·

concentration of our customer base and fulfillment of existing customer contracts;

 

 
33
 

 

 

·

our ability to maintain pricing;

 

 

 

 

·

the cyclical nature of the health care industry;

 

 

 

 

·

deterioration of the credit markets;

 

 

 

 

·

delays in obtaining required regulatory approvals;

 

 

 

 

·

our ability to raise additional capital to fund future capital expenditures;

 

 

 

 

·

increased vulnerability to adverse economic conditions due to indebtedness;

 

 

 

 

·

competition within the health care industry;

 

 

 

 

·

asset impairment and other charges;

 

 

 

 

·

our limited operating history on which investors will evaluate our business and prospects;

 

 

 

 

·

our identifying, making and integrating acquisitions;

 

 

 

 

·

our ability to obtain raw materials and specialized equipment;

 

 

 

 

·

technological developments or enhancements;

 

 

 

 

·

loss of key executives;

 

 

 

 

·

management control over stockholder voting;

 

 

 

 

·

the ability to employ skilled and qualified workers;

 

 

 

 

·

work stoppages and other labor matters;

 

 

 

 

·

hazards inherent to the health care industry;

 

 

 

 

·

inadequacy of insurance coverage for certain losses or liabilities;

 

 

 

 

·

regulations affecting the health care industry;

 

 

 

 

·

federal legislation and state legislative and regulatory initiatives relating to health care;

 

 

 

 

·

costs and liabilities associated with environmental, health and safety laws, including any changes in the interpretation or enforcement thereof;

 

 

 

 

·

future legislative and regulatory developments;

 

 

 

 

·

our beliefs regarding the future of our competitors;

 

 

 

 

·

our expectation that the demand for our products will eventually increase; and

 

 

 

 

·

our expectation that we will be able to raise capital when we need it.

   

These statements are only predictions and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, including the risks in the section entitled "Risk Factors" set forth in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, any of which may cause our company's or our industry's actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. These risks include, by way of example and not in limitation:

 

 

·

general economic and business conditions;

 

 

 

 

·

substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern;

 

 

 

 

·

our needs to raise additional funds in the future which may not be available on acceptable terms or at all;

 

 

 

 

·

our inability to successfully recruit and retain qualified personnel in order to continue our operations;

 

 

 

 

·

our ability to successfully implement our business plan;

 

 

 

 

·

if we are unable to successfully acquire, develop or commercialize new products;

 

 

 

 

·

our expenditures not resulting in commercially successful products;

 

 

 

 

·

third parties claiming that we may be infringing their proprietary rights that may prevent us from manufacturing and selling some of our products;

 

 

 

 

·

the impact of extensive industry regulation, and how that will continue to have a significant impact on our business, especially our product development, manufacturing and distribution capabilities; and

 

 

 

 

·

other factors discussed under the section entitled "Risk Factors" set forth in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Readers are urged to carefully review and consider the various disclosures made by us in this report and in our other reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The following Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations of the Company should be read in conjunction with the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements and notes related thereto included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. We undertake no obligation to update or revise forward-looking statements to reflect changed assumptions, the occurrence of unanticipated events or changes in the future operating results over time except as required by law. We believe that our assumptions are based upon reasonable data derived from and known about our business and operations. No assurances are made that actual results of operations or the results of our future activities will not differ materially from our assumptions.

 

As used in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and unless otherwise indicated, the terms "we", "us", "our", or the "Company" refer to Avant Diagnostics, Inc. Unless otherwise specified, all dollar amounts are expressed in United States dollars.

 

 
34
 

 

Overview

 

During the year ended September 30, 2015, we experienced the following corporate developments:

 

Agreement and Plan of Reorganization

 

Effective December 29, 2014, we completed a reverse recapitalization, as agreed in the definitive Agreement and Plan of Reorganization, of 100% of the outstanding equity interests of American Liberty Petroleum Corp. ("ALP"). Avant stockholders received 74,354,139 shares of common stock for a 93% equity interest in ALP. Such share exchange was calculated based on a one-for-one conversion ratio after a 1 for 17 reverse stock split of ALP which was subsequently effected in March 2015. The split affected the ALP common stock and not the Avant common stock. All references in the consolidated financial statements to the number of shares, options and other common stock equivalents, price per share and weighted-average number of shares outstanding of common stock have been adjusted to retroactively reflect the effect of the stock split. Per the terms of the Agreement and Plan of Reorganization, ALP was delivered with zero assets and $70,000 in liabilities at time of closing. Following the reverse merger, we changed the name of ALP to "Avant Diagnostics, Inc." The transaction was regarded as a reverse recapitalization whereby Avant was considered to be the accounting acquirer as it retained control of ALP after the exchange. Although ALP is the legal parent company, the share exchange was treated as a recapitalization of ALP. Avant is the continuing entity for financial reporting purposes. Accordingly, the assets and liabilities and the historical operations reflected in the consolidated financial statements are those of Avant for all periods presented.

 

As of September 30, 2015, there remained a total of 3,510,000 shares of common stock that still had not been converted by Avant stockholders as part of the reverse recapitalization. The Agreement and Plan of Reorganization does not provide for cash in lieu of exchange of shares and provides that upon the merger, the stockholders acquired their rights in ALP shares and all outstanding shares of Avant were deemed to be cancelled. There is no timeframe as to when the stockholders must convert their shares and, as of the date of this report, the shares have not been issued.

 

On January 27, 2015, the Company effected a change in the par value of its common stock to $0.00001 per share. Accordingly, the Company has recorded a retroactive reclassification to reflect the change in par value on its accompanying consolidated balance sheets for all periods presented.

 

Change of Fiscal Year

 

In connection with our acquisition of Avant Diagnostics, Inc., we changed our fiscal year from October 31 to September 30.

 

Corporate Actions Pursuant to Schedule 14C

 

Effective twenty days after the January 29, 2015 mailing date of our Schedule 14C, or February 18, 2015, we effected the following corporate actions:

 

 

·

Changed our corporate name to Avant Diagnostics, Inc.;

 

 

 

 

·

Effected a reverse stock split by a ratio of 1 for 17; and

 

 

 

 

·

Authorized the issuance of preferred stock with preferences, limitations, and relative rights designated by our board of directors.

  

Appointment of Members to Board of Directors

 

Effective February 20, 2015, we appointed Joseph Roth and Randall Letcavage to our Board of Directors.

 

Joseph Roth has spent the last three decades as a sales, marketing, and management executive with Fortune 50 companies as well as entrepreneur opportunities. For the past five years he has been self employed as a consultant to small and medium sized companies and C-level executives. From 2008 to 2010, he was Chief Operating Officer of ShopBox, LLC, a business process outsourcing company that specialized in the execution of web-based kiosk marketing strategies. He was responsible for securing partnership deals with NASCAR, NFL, NHL, and NBA leagues, teams, and franchises. From 2003 to 2008, Mr. Roth was President of CMB Franchising, Inc., a licensed Area Developer of Extreme Pita Restaurants of Canada for Arizona and Nevada. During this time, he oversaw the construction, development and operations of ten stores generating a 25% increase over the second highest volume franchise in the US. From 1996-2003, Mr. Roth was Managing Partner of Cypress Staffing Services, LLC, a company he founded in 1999 that provides private duty home care throughout Central Arizona. Cypress grew from scratch to become the largest company in AZ within its industry category in less than 4 years.

 

Randall Letcavage brings in excess of 25 years plus of business experience specializing in the financial markets, investment banking and business consulting. Currently, Mr. Letcavage is Chairman, CEO, and President of Premier Holding Corp, which is publicly traded on the OTCQB exchange. For the past 20 years Mr. Letcavage has been an investment banker widely recognized for numerous achievements as well as his role of Founder, Officer and Director of the iCapital Group that includes iCapital Finance Inc, iCapital Advisory LLC and iCap Development LLC (A National "CDE" Community Development Entity – Certified by the U.S Treasury Department). Mr. Letcavage has advised numerous clients on various transactions and financings in a wide range of industries, including technology, healthcare, financial services, entertainment, energy and Green Initiatives.

 

 
35
 

 

Departures of Certain Officers and Directors

 

On January 31, 2015, Steven Scott retired as the Company's Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and President.

 

Effective March 2, 2015, by way of certain stockholders holding not less than two-thirds of the voting power of the issued and outstanding shares of our Common Stock, we exercised the authority provided by Nevada Revised Statutes 78.335 to realign the board of directors by voting to remove Robert C. Rhodes and Steven M. Plumb as directors of the Company. As a result, as of March 2, 2015, the directors of the Company are Gregg Linn, Joseph Roth and Randall Letcavage.

 

On the same date, the newly elected directors terminated Robert C. Rhodes and Steven M. Plumb as officers of the Company and elected a new officer of the Company. As a result, the officers and directors of the Company are as follows:

 

Name

 

Title

Gregg Linn

 

President, Chief Executive Officer,

Chairman, Chief Financial Officer and Director

 

 

 

Joseph Roth

 

Director

 

 

 

Randall Letcavage

 

Director

 

Professional Services Agreement with DOCRO, Inc.

 

Effective February 23, 2015, we engaged the professional services of DOCRO, Inc. ("DOCRO") to manage the preparation and the submission of the pre-submission package for OvaDxÒ and to conduct the negotiation with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") office for the process for obtaining a 510(k) clearance of the OvaDxÒ device intended for use as an aid in monitoring women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. DOCRO shall be compensated by the Company on a project basis as expressly set forth in the engagement agreement. There are no other contingent payment terms under the engagement agreement. Additionally, we purchased the necessary serial set FDA specimens to be utilized in the near future for the FDA pre-submission trials.

 

Effective July 29, 2015, we expanded our professional service agreement with DOCRO to include the retention of a FDA clinical principle investigator as well as the purchase of additional single-point ovarian cancer specimens.

 

Results of Operations

 

Comparison of the Year Ended September 30, 2015 to the Year Ended September 30, 2015

 

Net Loss. For the year ended September 30, 2015, we had a net loss of $3,343,078 compared to a net loss of $525,000 for the year ended September 30, 2014. The increase in loss was primarily due to an increase in general and administrative expense from $452,299 for the year ended September 30, 2014 to $566,416 for the year ended September 30, 2015. Research and Development cost increased by $25,000. In the current year, an Impairment on Available for Sale Securities was $2,000,000.Expenses also increased primarily as the result of a non-cash cost associated with our reverse recapitalization totaling $641,126, which was the fair value of a warrant issued to a related party.

 

Revenue

 

We have not earned any revenues since our inception and we do not anticipate earning revenues in the near future.

 

Operating Expenses

 

General and administrative expenses increased by $114,117 from $452,299 to $566,416 for the year ended September 30, 2015, as compared to the same period in 2014. The overall increase is primarily the result of an increase in investor relations expense. Professional fee expenses increased by $37,835 from $72,701 to $110,536 for the same period, respectively, which was primarily due to an increase in the utilization of outside consultants for accounting. Expenses also increased primarily as the result of a non-cash cost associated with our reverse recapitalization totaling $641,126, which was the fair value of a warrant issued to related party and to facilitate the merger.

 

 
36
 

 

Other Expenses

 

As explained in Note 5 to the consolidated financial statements for the year ended September 30, 2015, we determined that our investment in available-for-sale securities had an other than temporary decline in value, and we chose to fully impair the value in our consolidated balance sheet as of June 30, 2015. As a result, we recorded a realized loss in the amount of $2,000,000 for the twelve months ended June 30, 2015.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Working Capital

 

The following table sets forth a summary of changes in working capital for the years ended September 30, 2015 and 2014:

 

 

 

Years Ended September 30,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Current assets

 

$43,677

 

 

$1,606,000

 

Current liabilities

 

 

621,315

 

 

 

166,000

 

Working capital

 

$(577,638)

 

$1,440,000

 

 

The decrease in working capital is due to a decrease in current assets from the value of marketable securities and an increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities. As described in Note 5, we chose to fully impair our available-for-sale securities, which consisted of 10,000,000 shares of Arrayit (OTCBB: ARYC) acquired in August 2014.

 

Cash Flows

 

The following table sets forth a summary of changes in cash flows for the years ended September 30, 2015 and 2014:

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

$(201,612)

 

$(127,000)

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(102,053)

 

 

-

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

341,300

 

 

 

90,000

 

Change in cash

 

$37,635

 

 

$(37,000)

 

The increase in cash used in operating activities was due to the higher net loss, which was partially offset by an increase in related party accrued expenses and accrued liabilities for the year ended September 30, 2015, as compared to the previous year. The increase in net cash provided by financing activities for the year ended September 30, 2015 is due to the issuance of common stock for cash for net proceeds of $340,000.

 

Going Concern

 

The consolidated financial statements contained in this annual report have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. We have accumulated losses since inception through September 30, 2015 of $9,814,078. Presently, we may not have sufficient cash resources to meet our plans for the next twelve months. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company's ability to continueas a going concern. The audited consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that may be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern. Our continuation as a going concern is dependent on our ability to obtain additional financing as may be required and ultimately to attain profitability.

 

Subsequent to September 30, 2015, the Company continues to incur net losses from operating activities. The Company raised $225,000 from private placement offerings during December 2015 and January 2016. The Company has been able to allocate much of the funds raised through private financing directly toward obtaining FDA approval for OvaDxÒ and a minimal amount of cash has been used towards operating activities. Most of the contracts are paid with Company stock instead of cash or at reduced rates. Without the continued support of our investors, contracted professionals and vendors the Company would not be able to continue.

 

We believe that we will require additional financing to carry out our intended objectives during the next twelve months. There can be no assurance, however, that such financing will be available or, if it is available, that we will be able to structure such financing on terms acceptable to us and that it will be sufficient to fund our cash requirements until we can reach a level of profitable operations and positive cash flows. If we are unable to obtain the financing necessary to support our operations, we may be unable to continue as a going concern. We currently have no firm commitments for any additional capital. Further, if we issue additional equity or debt securities, stockholders may experience additional dilution or the new equity securities may have rights, preferences or privileges senior to those of existing holders of our shares of common stock or the debt securities may cause us to be subject to restrictive covenants. Even if we are able to raise the funds required, it is possible that we could incur unexpected costs and expenses or experience unexpected cash requirements that would force us to seek additional financing. If additional financing is not available or is not available on acceptable terms, we will have to curtail our operations and our intellectual property could be impaired.

 

 
37
 

 

Cash Requirements

 

Our plan of operation over the next 12 months is to: 

 

 

·

initiate regulatory activities in the United states;

 

 

 

 

·

locate suitable facility on the U.S. for tech transfer and manufacturing scale-up;

 

 

 

 

·

hire key personnel including, but not limited to, a controller, chief medical officer, chief science officer and chief operating officer;

 

 

 

 

·

collaborate with clinical centers and regulations to carry out clinical studies and clinical safety testing; and

 

 

 

 

·

initialize efforts to validate the manufacturing process (in certified labs).

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that is material to stockholders.

 

Contractual Obligations and Commitments

 

We have no material long-term contractual cash obligations as of September 30, 2015.

 

Effects of Inflation

 

We do not believe that inflation has had a material impact on our business, revenues or operating results during the periods presented.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

The Company has adopted Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2014-10, Development Stage Entities (Topic 915): Elimination of Certain Financial Reporting Requirements, Including an Amendment to Variable Interest Entities Guidance in Topic 810, Consolidation. The amendments in this ASU remove all incremental financial reporting requirements from U.S. GAAP for development stage entities, including the removal of Topic 915, Development Stage Entities, from the FASB Accounting Standards Codification™.

 

A development stage entity is one that devotes substantially all of its efforts to establishing a new business and for which: (a) planned principal operations have not commenced; or (b) planned principal operations have commenced, but have produced no significant revenue. For example, many start-ups or even long-lived organizations that have not yet begun their principal operations or do not have significant revenue would be identified as development stage entities.

For public business entities, the presentation and disclosure requirements in Topic 915 will no longer be required for the first annual period beginning after December 15, 2014. The revised consolidation standards are effective one year later, in annual periods beginning after December 15, 2015. Early adoption is permitted.

The Company has chosen to adopt the provisions of the ASU, hence all of the past development stage disclosures and presentations have been eliminated.

 

The FASB has issued ASU No. 2014-12, Compensation  Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Accounting for Share-Based Payments When the Terms of an Award Provide That a Performance Target Could Be achieved after the Requisite Service Period. This ASU requires that a performance target that affects vesting, and that could be achieved after the requisite service period, be treated as a performance condition. As such, the performance target should not be reflected in estimating the grant date fair value of the award. This update further clarifies that compensation cost should be recognized in the period in which it becomes probable that the performance target will be achieved and should represent the compensation cost attributable to the period(s) for which the requisite service has already been rendered. The amendments in this ASU are effective for annual periods and interim periods within those annual periods beginning after December 15, 2015. Earlier adoption is permitted. The Company has not yet determined the effect of the adoption of this standard and it is expected to have a material impact on the Company's consolidated financial statements.

 

 
38
 

 

In August 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-15, "Presentation of Financial Statements— Going Concern (Subtopic 205-40), Disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entity's Ability to Continue as a Going Concern". Continuation of a reporting entity as a going concern is presumed as the basis for preparing financial statements unless and until the entity's liquidation becomes imminent. Preparation of financial statements under this presumption is commonly referred to as the going concern basis of accounting. Currently, there is no guidance under U.S. GAAP about management's responsibility to evaluate whether there is substantial doubt about an entity's ability to continue as a going concern or to provide related footnote disclosures. The amendments in this Update provide that guidance. In doing so, the amendments should reduce diversity in the timing and content of footnote disclosures. The amendments require management to assess an entity's ability to continue as a going concern by incorporating and expanding upon certain principles that are currently in U.S. auditing standards. Specifically, the amendments (1) provide a definition of the term substantial doubt, (2) require an evaluation every reporting period including interim periods, (3) provide principles for considering the mitigating effect of management's plans, (4) require certain disclosures when substantial doubt is alleviated as a result of consideration of management's plans, (5) require an express statement and other disclosures when substantial doubt is not alleviated, and (6) require an assessment for a period of one year after the date that the financial statements are issued (or available to be issued). For the period ended June 30, 2015, management evaluated the Company's ability to continue as a going concern and concluded that substantial doubt has not been alleviated about the Company's ability to continue as a going concern. While the Company continues to explore further significant sources of financing, management's assessment was based on the uncertainty related to the amount and nature of such financing over the next twelve months. Management is currently evaluating the impact of ASU No. 2014-15 on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In April 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issued Accounting Standards Update ("ASU") No. 2015-03, "Interest -Imputation of Interest (Subtopic 835-30): Simplifying the Presentation of Debt Issuance Costs" ("ASU 2015-03"). ASU 2015-03 amends the existing guidance to require that debt issuance costs be presented in the balance sheet as a deduction from the carrying amount of the related debt liability instead of as a deferred charge. ASU 2015-03 is effective on a retrospective basis for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2015, but early adoption is permitted. The Company does not anticipate that the adoption of this standard will have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

 

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK.

 

Not Applicable.

 

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA.

 

The full text of our audited consolidated financial statements as of September 30, 2015 and 2014, begins on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE.

 

On May 4, 2015, the Company dismissed LBB & Associates Ltd., LLP ("LBB") as the independent registered public accounting firm for the Company and its subsidiaries, effective immediately. The Company's board of directors approved the dismissal on April 22, 2015.

 

The reports of LBB on the financial statements of the Company for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013 and through May 4, 2015 did not contain an adverse opinion or disclaimer of opinion, and were not qualified or modified as to uncertainty, audit scope or accounting principles.

 

During the fiscal years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013 and through May 4, 2015: (i) there have been no disagreements with LBB on any matter of accounting principles or practices, financial statement disclosure or auditing scope or procedure, which disagreements, if not resolved to the satisfaction of LBB, would have caused it to make reference to the subject matter of the disagreement in connection with its reports for such periods and (ii) there were no "reportable events" as defined in Item 304(a)(1)(v) of Regulation S-K.

 

Effective May 4, 2015, the Company engaged Marcum LLP ("Marcum") as the new independent registered public accounting firm for the Company and its subsidiaries.

 

During the fiscal years ended September 30, 2014 and 2013 and through May 4, 2015, neither the Company nor anyone on its behalf consulted Marcum regarding (i) the application of accounting principles to a specific transaction, either completed or proposed, or the type of audit opinion that might be rendered on the Company's financial statements, or (ii) any matter that was the subject of a disagreement (as defined in Item 304(a)(1)(iv) of Regulation S-K) or any reportable event (as described in Item 304(a)(1)(v) of Regulation S-K). Marcum did not provide the Company with a written report or oral advice that they concluded was an important factor considered by the Company in reaching a decision as to accounting, auditing or financial reporting issue.

 

 
39
 

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES.

 

Disclosure Controls and Procedures 

 

As required by Rule 13a-15(b) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"), our management carried out an evaluation, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) of the Exchange Act), as of the period covered by this report. Disclosure controls and procedures are defined as controls and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in reports filed with the SEC under the Exchange Act is (i) recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC's rules and forms and (ii) accumulated and communicated to the Company's management, including its principal executive officer and principal financial officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Based upon their evaluation, our management (including our Chief Executive Officer) concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of September 30, 2015, based on the material weaknesses defined below.

 

Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

Management's Annual Report on Internal Control of Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Internal control over financial reporting is a set of processes designed by, or under the supervision of, a company's principal executive and principal financial officers, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with GAAP and includes those policies and procedures that:

 

·

pertain to the maintenance of records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect our transactions and dispositions of our assets,

 

·

provide reasonable assurance our transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of our financial statements in accordance with GAAP, and that receipts and expenditures are being made only in accordance with authorizations of our management and directors, and

 

·

provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of our assets that could have a material effect on the financial statement.

 

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. It should be noted that any system of internal control, however well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, and not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the system will be met. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

 

Under the supervision and with the participation of management, including its principal executive officer and principal financial officer, the Company's management assessed the design and operating effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting as of September 30, 2015 based on the framework set forth in Internal Control—Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.

 

We have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting.

 

If we fail to develop and maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results in a timely manner, which may adversely affect investor confidence in our company

 

The material weaknesses related to a lack of a full segregation of duties and to our lack of sufficient personnel in our accounting and financial reporting functions with sufficient experience and expertise with respect to the application of U.S. GAAP and related financial reporting.

 

Based on this assessment, management concluded that the Company's internal control over financial reporting was not effective as of September 30, 2015. 

 

 
40
 

 

Management's Remediation Plan 

 

We plan to take steps to enhance and improve the design of our internal control over financial reporting. During the period covered by this annual report on Form 10-K, we have not been able to remediate the material weaknesses identified above. To remediate such weaknesses, we plan to implement the following changes in the future:

 

(i)

appoint additional qualified personnel to address inadequate segregation of duties and ineffective risk management; and

(ii)

adopt sufficient written policies and procedures for accounting and financial reporting.

 

The remediation efforts set out in (i) are largely dependent upon our company securing additional financing to cover the costs of implementing the changes required. If we are unsuccessful in securing such funds, remediation efforts may be adversely affected in a material manner. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues, if any, within our company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. 

 

Management believes that despite our material weaknesses set forth above, our consolidated financial statements for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2015 are fairly stated, in all material respects, in accordance with US GAAP. 

 

Attestation Report of the Registered Accounting Firm

 

This Annual Report does not include an attestation report of the Company's independent registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management's report was not subject to attestation by the Company's independent registered public accounting firm pursuant to Rule 308(b) of Regulation S-K, which permits the Company to provide only management's report in this Annual Report.

 

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

No changes in the Company's internal control over financial reporting have come to management's attention during the Company's last fiscal quarter that have materially affected, or are likely to materially affect, the Company's internal control over financial reporting.

 

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION.

 

None.

 

 
41
 

 

PART III

 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE.

 

Executive Officers and Directors

 

The names, ages and positions of our directors and executive officers as of September 30, 2015, are as follows:

 

Name

 

Age

 

 

Position

Gregg Linn

 

 53

 

 

President, Chief Executive Officer, Chairman, Chief Financial Officer and Director

Joseph Roth

 

 55

 

 

Director

Randall Letcavage

 

 50

 

 

Director

 

All directors hold office until the next annual meeting of stockholders and the election and qualification of their successors. Officers are elected annually by the board of directors and serve at the discretion of the board.

 

Background of Executive Officers and Directors

 

The principal occupations for the past five years (and, in some instances, for prior years) of each of our directors and executive officers are as follows:

 

Gregg Linn has served as our Chief Executive Officer, President and a Director since January 2015. Mr. Linn, age 53, is a certified public accountant licensed in the State of Arizona. Mr. Linn has been a senior level executive primarily with small cap publicly traded companies for over 30-years. From December 2012 to the present, Mr. Linn served as the Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer for Avant Diagnostics, Inc., a molecular diagnostics company. Additionally, from March 2012 to the present, Mr. Linn has served as Managing Member and Chief Executive Officer of Precision Metal Products, LLC, a high precision sheet metal manufacture; From January 2009 to the present, Mr. Linn has served as the Managing Member and President of Issuers Capital Advisors, LLC, which provides financial advisory services to small cap publicly traded companies. Mr. Linn earned his Master Degree in Finance from Pace University in New York City in May 1992 and his Bachelor's Degree in Accounting from the Michigan State University in East Lansing, MI in June 1984.

 

Joseph Roth has served as a director of the Company since February 20, 2015. Mr. Roth has spent the last three decades as a sales, marketing, and management executive with Fortune 50 companies as well as entrepreneur opportunities. For the past five years he has been self employed as a consultant to small and medium sized companies and C-level executives. From 2008 to 2010, he was Chief Operating Officer of ShopBox, LLC, a business process outsourcing company that specialized in the execution of web-based kiosk marketing strategies. He was responsible for securing partnership deals with NASCAR, NFL, NHL, and NBA leagues, teams, and franchises. From 2003 to 2008, Mr. Roth was President of CMB Franchising, Inc., a licensed Area Developer of Extreme Pita Restaurants of Canada for Arizona and Nevada. During this time, he oversaw the construction, development and operations of ten stores generating a 25% increase over the second highest volume franchise in the US. From 1996-2003, Mr. Roth was Managing Partner of Cypress Staffing Services, LLC, a company he founded in 1999 that provides private duty home care throughout Central Arizona. Cypress grew from scratch to become the largest company in AZ within its industry category in less than 4 years.

 

Randall Letcavage brings in excess of 25 years plus of business experience specializing in the financial markets, investment banking and business consulting. Currently, Mr. Letcavage is Chairman, CEO, and President of Premier Holding Corp, which is publicly traded on the OTCQB exchange. For the past 20 years Mr. Letcavage has been an investment banker widely recognized for numerous achievements as well as his role of Founder, Officer and Director of the iCapital Group that includes iCapital Finance Inc, iCapital Advisory LLC and iCap Development LLC (A National "CDE" Community Development Entity – Certified by the U.S Treasury Department). Mr. Letcavage has advised numerous clients on various transactions and financings in a wide range of industries, including technology, healthcare, financial services, entertainment, energy and Green Initiatives.

 

Family Relationships

 

There are no family relationships between any director, executive officer, or person nominated or chosen by the registrant to become a director or executive officer.

 

 
42
 


Director Experience

 

Our Board believes that each of the Company's directors should possess the highest personal and professional ethics, integrity and values, and be committed to representing the long-term interests of the Company's shareholders. When evaluating candidates for election to the Board, the Board seeks candidates with certain qualities that it believes are important, including integrity, an objective perspective, good judgment, and leadership skills. Our directors are highly educated and have diverse backgrounds and talents and extensive track records of success in what we believe are highly relevant positions.

 

Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings

 

To our knowledge, during the past ten years, none of our directors, executive officers, promoters, control persons, or nominees has been: 

 

 

·

any bankruptcy petition filed by or against such person or any business of which such person was a general partner or executive officer either at the time of the bankruptcy or within two years prior to that time;

 

 

 

 

·

any conviction in a criminal proceeding or being subject to a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses);

 

 

 

 

·

being subject to any order, judgment, or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining him from or otherwise limiting his involvement in any type of business, securities or banking activities or to be associated with any person practicing in banking or securities activities;

 

 

 

 

·

being found by a court of competent jurisdiction in a civil action, the Securities and Exchange Commission or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law, and the judgment has not been reversed, suspended, or vacated;

 

 

 

 

·

being subject of, or a party to, any federal or state judicial or administrative order, judgment decree, or finding, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, relating to an alleged violation of any federal or state securities or commodities law or regulation, any law or regulation respecting financial institutions or insurance companies, or any law or regulation prohibiting mail or wire fraud or fraud in connection with any business entity; or

 

 

 

 

·

being subject of or party to any sanction or order, not subsequently reversed, suspended, or vacated, of any self-regulatory organization, any registered entity or any equivalent exchange, association, entity or organization that has disciplinary authority over its members or persons associated with a member.

 

Code of Ethics

 

We have adopted a Code of Business Conduct and Ethics to ensure that our business is conducted in a consistently legal and ethical manner. All of our employees, including our executive officers and directors, are required to comply with our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics.

 

The full text of the Code of Business Conduct and Ethics is posted on our website at http://www.avantdiagnostics.com. Any waiver of the Code of Business Conduct and Ethics for directors or executive officers must be approved by our Audit Committee. We will disclose future amendments to our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics, or waivers from our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics for our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller, or persons performing similar functions, on our website within four business days following the date of the amendment or waiver. In addition, we will disclose any waiver from our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics for our other executive officers and our directors on our website. A copy of our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics will also be provided free of charge upon request to: Secretary, Avant Diagnostics, Inc. 8561 East Anderson Drive, Suite 104, Scottsdale, AZ 85225.

 

Committees of the board of directors

 

Our board of directors has authorized an audit committee charter, compensation committee charter, nominating and governance committee charter, executive committee charter and nominating committee charter. Our board may also establish from time to time any other committees that it deems necessary or desirable. The composition of each committee will comply, when required, with NYSE listing standards and other rules of the SEC and NYSE.

 

 
43
 

 

Audit Committee

 

The Audit Committee's responsibilities include, among other things,: (i) reviewing the independence, qualifications, services, fees, and performance of the independent registered public accountants, (ii) appointing, replacing and discharging the independent registered public accounting firm, (iii) pre-approving the professional services provided by the independent registered public accounting firm, (iv) reviewing the scope of the annual audit and reports and recommendations submitted by the independent registered public accounting firm, and (v) reviewing our financial reporting and accounting policies, including any significant changes, with management and the independent registered public accounting firm. The Audit Committee also prepares the Audit Committee report that is required pursuant to the rules of the SEC.

 

We have not yet appointed an audit committee, and our Board of Directors currently acts as our Audit Committee. The Company intends to appoint an Audit Committee comprised entirely of independent directors, including at least one audit committee financial expert in foreseeable future. The board of directors has adopted a written charter setting forth the authority and responsibilities of the Audit Committee and is available on our website at www.avantdiagnostics.com.

  

Audit Committee Financial Expert

 

The Company's does not have an audit committee financial expert since Company's board of directors currently acts as the audit committee and the board of directors currently consists of only three directors one of which is the Company's sole officer. While the Company believe that the members of Board of Directors are collectively capable of analyzing and evaluating our financial statements and understanding internal controls and procedures for financial reporting the Company is currently engaged in a search to identify a qualified individual who will meet the definition of "audit committee financial expert as that term is defined by Item 407(d)(5) of Regulation S-K.

 

Compensation Committee

 

The Compensation Committee has responsibility for assisting the board of directors in, among other things, evaluating and making recommendations regarding the compensation of the executive officers and directors of our company; assuring that the executive officers are compensated effectively in a manner consistent with our stated compensation strategy; producing an annual report on executive compensation in accordance with the rules and regulations promulgated by the SEC; periodically evaluating the terms and administration of our incentive plans and benefit programs and monitoring of compliance with the legal prohibition on loans to our directors and executive officers.

 

We have not yet appointed a compensation committee, and our Board of Directors currently acts as our Compensation Committee. The Company intends to appoint a Compensation Committee comprised entirely of independent directors in foreseeable future. The board of directors has adopted a written charter setting forth the authority and responsibilities of the Compensation Committee and is available on our website at www.avantdiagnostics.com.

 

Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation

 

None of the members of our compensation committee is an officer or employee of our company. None of our executive officers currently serves, or in the past year has served, as a member of the board of directors or compensation committee of any entity that has one or more executive officers serving on our board of directors or compensation committee.

  

 
44
 

 

Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee

 

The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee has responsibility for assisting the board of directors in, among other things, effecting board organization, membership and function including identifying qualified board nominees; effecting the organization, membership and function of board committees including composition and recommendation of qualified candidates; establishment of and subsequent periodic evaluation of successor planning for the chief executive officer and other executive officers; development and evaluation of criteria for Board membership such as overall qualifications, term limits, age limits and independence; and oversight of compliance with the Corporate Governance Guidelines. The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee shall identify and evaluate the qualifications of all candidates for nomination for election as directors. Potential nominees are identified by the Board of Directors based on the criteria, skills and qualifications that have been recognized by the Nominating and Corporate GovernanceCommittee. While our nomination and corporate governance policy does not prescribe specific diversity standards, the Nominating and Corporate GovernanceCommittee and its independent members seek to identify nominees that have a variety of perspectives, professional experience, education, differences in viewpoints and skills, and personal qualities that will result in a well-rounded Board of Directors.

 

We have not yet appointed a compensation committee, and our Board of Directors currently acts as our Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee. The Company intends to appoint a Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee in foreseeable future. The board of directors has adopted a written charter setting forth the authority and responsibilities of the Nominating and Corporate Governance and is available on our website at www.avantdiagnostics.com.

  

Director Compensation

 

Directors are expected to timely and fully participate in all regular and special board meetings, and all meetings of committees that they serve on.

 

The following table sets forth summary information concerning the total compensation paid to our non-employee directors for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2015 for services to our company.

 

Name

 

Fees Earned or

Paid in Cash

 

 

Option
Awards(1)

 

 

Total

 

Joseph Roth

 

$--

 

 

$3,750

 

 

$3,750

 

Randall Letcavage

 

$--

 

 

$3,750

 

 

$3,750

 

 

(1) On April 22, 2015, we issued each director 50,000 shares of common stock of the Company.

 

Director Independence

 

Our securities are not listed on a national securities exchange or in an inter-dealer quotation system that requires that a majority of our board of directors be independent. As of the date of this Annual Report, our board of directors has determined that a majority of the board consists of members who are currently "independent" as that term is defined under current listing standards of NASDAQ.

 

Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

 

Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 requires the officers, directors, and persons who beneficially own more than 10% of the Company's common stock to file reports of securities ownership and changes in such ownership with the SEC. Officers, directors and greater than 10% beneficial owners are also required by rules promulgated by the SEC to furnish the Company with copies of all Section 16(a) forms they file.

 

Based solely upon a review of the copies of such forms furnished to the Company, or written representations that no filings were required, the Company believes that during the fiscal year ended September 30, 2015, all filings required under Section 16(a) have been timely filed, except our executive officers and directors have not filed a Form 3 to date. Our executive officers and directors intend on filing their respective Form 3s in the near future.

 

 
45
 

 

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION.

 

Summary Compensation Table

 

The table below sets forth, for the last two fiscal years, the compensation earned by (i) each individual who served as our principal executive officer or principal financial officer during the last fiscal year and (ii) our most highly compensated executive officer, other than those listed in clause (i) above, who were serving as executive officers at the end of the last fiscal year (together, the "Named Executive Officers"). No other executive officer had annual compensation in excess of $100,000 during the last fiscal year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Option

 

 

All Other

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salary

 

 

Bonus

 

 

Awards

 

 

Compensation

 

 

Total

 

Name and Principal Position

 

Year

 

($)

 

 

($)

 

 

($)

 

 

($)

 

 

($)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gregg Linn (1)

 

2015

 

$240,000

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

$

54,000

 

 

$294,000

 

Chief Executive Officer, President and Director

 

2014

 

$--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

________________ 

(1)

The salary and other compensation has been accrued but has not been paid. As of the date this Annual Report, no salary or other compensation has been paid. In accordance with the terms of his employment agreement, Mr. Linn is entitled to receive a yearly automobile allowance of $18,000 as well as yearly payments for health insurance equal to $36,000. The amounts have been accrued but not paid as of the date of this Annual Report.

 

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End

 

There were no outstanding unexercised options, unvested stock, and/or equity incentive plan awards issued to our named executive officers as of September 30, 2015.

 

Employment Agreements

 

On October 1, 2014, we entered into an employment agreement with Gregg Linn, our Chief Executive Officer. The employment agreement provide that Mr. Linn will receive an annual base salary of $240,000 per year. In addition, Mr. Linn is entitled to monthly car allowance of $1,500 and the Company has agreed to pay to Mr. Linn the greater of 100% of all health care premiums of $3,000 per month. Mr. Linn is entitled to participate in any and all benefit plans, from time to time, in effect for senior management, along with vacation, sick and holiday pay in accordance with the Company's policies established and in effect from time to time. The employment agreement provides for termination of Mr. Linn's employment without any further obligation on our part upon the death or disability of the executive or for cause. In the event that an executive's employment is terminated for good reason, we are obligated to pay Mr. Linn his base salary for a twelve month period beginning on the date of termination and any pro-rated potion of any bonus payable to Mr. Linn, which shall be assumed to be 30% of his base compensation unless otherwise provided for by the board of directors.

 

The employment agreements also contain covenants (a) restricting the executive from engaging in any activity competitive with our business during the term of the employment agreement and in the event of termination for cause or without good reason, for a period of eighteen months thereafter, (b) prohibiting the executive from disclosing confidential information regarding us, and (c) soliciting our employees, customers and prospective customers during the term of the employment agreement and for a period of eighteen months thereafter.

 

  

 
46
 

 

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS.

 

The following table sets forth information regarding the beneficial ownership of our common stock as of September 30, 2015 by (a) each person who is known by us to beneficially own 5% or more of our common stock, (b) each of our directors and executive officers, and (c) all of our directors and executive officers as a group.

 

Name of Beneficial Owner (1)

 

Common Stock Beneficially Owned

 

 

Percentage of

Common Stock (2)

 

Gregg Linn

 

 

11,841,176

 

 

 

12.34%

Joseph Roth

 

 

258,334

 

 

 

.27%

Randall Letcavage

 

 

50,000

 

 

 

.05%

All Executive Officers and Directors as a group (3 people)

 

 

12,149,510

 

 

 

12.66%
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5% Shareholders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arrayit Corporation (3)

927 Thompson Place
Sunnyvale, CA 94085

 

 

39,350,000

 

 

 

41.01%
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issuers Capital Advisors LLC (4)

 

 

7,000,000

 

 

 

7.30%
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steven Scott

11364 E. Appaloosa Pl.

Scottsdale, AZ 85259

 

 

11,741,176

 

 

 

12.24%

_________________ 

(1)

The address of each person is c/o Avant Diagnostics, Inc., 8561 E. Anderson Drive, Ste. 104, Scottsdale, AZ 85255 unless otherwise indicated herein.

 

(2)

The calculation in this column is based upon 95,944,743 shares of common stock outstanding on September 30, 2015. Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission and generally includes voting or investment power with respect to securities. Shares of common stock that are currently exercisable or exercisable within 60 days of September 30, 2015 are deemed to be beneficially owned by the person holding such securities for the purpose of computing the percentage of ownership of such person, but are not treated as outstanding for the purpose of computing the percentage ownership of any other person.

 

(3)

Mr. Linn has voting and dispositive power over the shares held by Arrayit Corporation.

 

(4)

Mr. Linn owns 100% membership interest in Issuers Capital Advisors, LLC. Mr. Linn has voting and dispositive power over the shares held by Issuers Capital Advisors, LLC.

 

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

The following is a description of transactions since September 30, 2014 to which the Company has been a party in which the amount involved exceed or will exceed $120,000 and in which any of the person who serves as our director and executive officer or with any beneficial owners of more than 5% of our common stock, or entities affiliated with them, had or will have a director or indirect material interest.

 

As of December 31, 2014, the Company leases corporate office space under a month-to-month operating lease of $200 per month from an entity Controlled by the Company's Chief Executive Officer. For the years ended September 30, 2015 and 2014, total rent expense was $2,400 and $1,800, respectively. The Company had accrued expenses due to current and former officers, consisting of mainly salary. For the year ended September 30, 2015 and 2014 accrued expenses due to officers was $456,000 and $52,000. 

 

 
47
 

 

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES.

 

The aggregate fees billed for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2015 and 2014 for professional services rendered by our principal accountants for (1) the audit of its annual financial statements and review of financial statements included in Form 10-Q and Form 10-K ("Audit Fees"), (2) assurance and related services provided that are reasonably related to the audit ("Audit-Related Fees"), (3) tax compliance, advice, and planning ("Tax Fees"), and (iv) other products or services provided ("Other Fees"). 

 

 

 

Year Ended September 30,

2015

 

 

Year Ended September 30,

2014

 

Audit fees

 

$70,000

 

 

$14,800

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Audit related fees

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tax fees

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All other fees

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$70,000

 

 

$14,800

 

 

Audit fees. Audit fees represent fees for professional services performed by our principal accountants for the audit of our annual financial statements and the review of our quarterly financial statements, as well as services that are normally provided in connection with statutory and regulatory filings or engagements.

 

Audit-related fees. Audit-related fees represent fees for assurance and related services performed by our principal accountants that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of our financial statements.

 

Tax Fees. Our principal accountants did not perform any tax compliance services.

 

All other fees. Our principal accountants did not receive any other audit fees for 2015 and 2014.

 

The Board of Directors selects our independent public accountant, establishes procedures for monitoring and submitting information or complaints related to accounting, internal controls or auditing matters, engages outside advisors, and makes decisions related to funding the outside auditory and non-auditory advisors.

 

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES.

 

The following documents are filed as a part of this report or incorporated herein by reference:

 

(1)

Our Consolidated Financial Statements are listed on page F-1 of this Annual Report.

 

 

 

(2)

Financial Statement Schedules:

 

None.

 

(3)

Exhibits:

 

 
48
 

 

The following documents are included as exhibits to this Annual Report:

 

Exhibit

Number

Description of Exhibits

 

 

 

2.1

Agreement and Plan of Reorganization between American Liberty Petroleum Corp, Avant Diagnostics, Inc. and Avant Acquisition Corp, dated December 29, 2014 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.4 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed on December 30, 2014)

 

 

 

3.1

Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation of the Company (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed on May 24, 2010)

 

 

 

3.2

Bylaws of the Company (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 of the Annual Report on Form 10-K filed on

February 16, 2010)

 

 

 

4.1

Convertible Promissory Note, dated January 5, 2016 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed on January 12, 2016)

 

 

 

10.1

American Liberty Petroleum Corp., 2014 Directors, Officers and Consultants Stock Option, Stock Warrant and Stock Award Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed on December 30, 2014)

 

 

 

10.2

Rhodes Holdings LLC Consulting Agreement with American Liberty Petroleum Corp. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed on December 30, 2014)

 

 

 

10.3

Clear Financial Solutions, Inc. Consulting Agreement with American Liberty Petroleum Corp (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.3 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed on December 30, 2014)

 

 

 

10.4

Technology Assignment Agreement, dated July 18, 2009, between Arrayit Diagnostics, Inc. and Arrayit Corporation*

 

 

 

10.5

Employment Agreement, dated October 1, 2014, by and between Arrayit Diagnostics, Inc. and Gregg Linn*

 

 

 

10.6

Securities Purchase Agreement, dated January 5, 2016 by and between Avant Diagnostics, Inc. and St. George Investments LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed on January 12, 2016)

 

 

 

16.1

Letter from LBB & Associates Ltd., LLP, dated May 5, 2015 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 16.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed on May 6. 2015)

31.1

Certification of Principal Executive Officer as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.*

 

 

 

31.2

Certification of Principal Financial Officer as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.*

 

 

 

32.1

Certification of Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.*

 

 

 

101.INS

XBRL Instance Document*

 

 

 

101.SCH

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document*

 

 

 

101.CAL

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document*

 

 

 

101.LAB

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document*

 

 

 

101.PRE

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document*

 

 

 

101.DEF

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document*

_______________ 

*

Filed herewith

 

 
49
 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.

Date: January 13, 2016

By:

/s/ Gregg Linn

Name:

Gregg Linn

Title:

Chief Executive Officer (Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer), President and Director

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this Annual Report on Form 10-K has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the Registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

Signature

 

Title

 

Date

 

 

/s/ Gregg Linn

 

Chairman of the Board of Directors, Chief Executive Officer and

 

January 13, 2016

Gregg Linn

 

President (Principal Executive Officer, Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)

 

 

 

 

/s/ Joseph Roth

 

Director

 

January 13, 2016

Joseph Roth

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ Randall Letcavage

 

Director

 

January 13, 2016

Randall Letcavage

 

 

 

 
50
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.

 

INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Financial Statements for Fiscal Years ended September 30, 2015 and 2014

 

 

 

Page

 

Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

 

F-2

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of September 30, 2015 and 2014

 

 

F-4

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended September 30, 2015 and 2014

 

 

F-5

 

Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows for the years ended September 30, 2015 and 2014

 

 

F-6

 

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders' Equity as of September 30, 2015 and 2014

 

 

F-7

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

 

F-8

 

 

 
F-1
 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of

Avant Diagnostics, Inc.,

Scottsdale, AZ

 

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Avant Diagnostics, Inc. as of September 30, 2014, and the related statements of operations, comprehensive loss, stockholders' equity (deficit), and cash flows for the year then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Avant Diagnostics, Inc. as of September 30, 2014, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

/s/ LBB & Associates Ltd., LLP

LBB & Associates Ltd., LLP

Houston, Texas

December 12, 2014

 

 
F-2
 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of Avant Diagnostics, Inc.

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of Avant Diagnostics, Inc. (the "Company") as of September 30, 2015, and the related consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss, changes in stockholders' equity and cash flows for the year then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Avant Diagnostics, Inc. as of September 30, 2015, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue as a going concern. As more fully described in Note 2, the Company has not generated any revenues, has incurred significant losses and needs to raise additional funds to meet its obligations and sustain its operations. These conditions raise substantial doubt about the Company's ability to continue as a going concern. Management's plans in regard to these matters are also described in Note 2. These financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

/s/ Marcum LLP

 

Marcum LLP

New York, NY
January 13, 2016

 

 
F-3
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
SEPTEMBER 30, 2015 AND 2014

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

ASSETS

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash

 

$43,635

 

 

$6,000

 

Prepaid expenses

 

 

42

 

 

 

-

 

Available for sale securities

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,600,000

 

Total current assets

 

 

43,677

 

 

 

1,606,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intellectual property

 

 

1,651,875

 

 

 

1,549,822

 

Patent costs

 

 

143,178

 

 

 

143,178

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$1,838,730

 

 

$3,299,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$159,598

 

 

$114,000

 

Accrued payroll & benefits

 

 

320,000

 

 

 

-

 

Due to related party

 

 

141,717

 

 

 

52,000

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

621,315

 

 

 

166,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders' equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 50,000,000 shares authorized

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Series B preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 3,000 shares authorized, -0- shares issued and outstanding as of September 30, 2015 and 2014

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Common stock, $0.00001 par value; 450,000,000 shares authorized; 95,944,743 and 71,656,000 shares issued and outstanding as of September 30, 2015 and 2014, respectively

 

 

959

 

 

 

717

 

Additional paid in capital

 

 

11,030,534

 

 

 

10,003,283

 

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

 

 

-

 

 

 

(400,000)

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(9,814,078)

 

 

(6,471,000)

Total stockholders' equity

 

 

1,217,415

 

 

 

3,133,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities and stockholders' equity

 

$1,838,730

 

 

$3,299,000

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 
F-4
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND COMPREHENSIVE LOSS

 

 

 

Year ended September 30,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

OPERATING EXPENSES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

General and administrative

 

$566,416

 

 

$452,299

 

Professional fees

 

 

110,536

 

 

 

72,701

 

Research and development

 

 

25,000

 

 

 

-

 

Merger costs

 

 

641,126

 

 

 

-

 

Loss from operations

 

 

1,343,078

 

 

 

525,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Impairment of available for sale securities

 

 

2,000,000

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NET LOSS

 

$(3,343,078)

 

$(525,000)
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss per common share, basic and diluted

 

$(0.04)

 

$(0.01)
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average number of common shares outstanding, basic and diluted

 

 

85,838,985

 

 

 

50,172,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive loss:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$(3,343,078)

 

$(525,000)

Unrealized losses on available for sale securities

 

 

-

 

 

 

(400,000)

Adjustment for realized loss on available for sale securities

 

 

400,000

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive loss

 

$(2,943,078)

 

$(925,000)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 
F-5
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY
TWO YEARS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accumulated

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional

 

 

Other

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock

 

 

Common stock

 

 

Paid in

 

 

Comprehensive

 

 

Accumulated

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares

 

 

Amount

 

 

Shares

 

 

Amount

 

 

Capital

 

 

Loss

 

 

Deficit

 

 

Total

 

Balance, September 30, 2013

 

 

-

 

 

$-

 

 

 

44,806,000

 

 

$448

 

 

$5,885,552

 

 

$-

 

 

$(5,946,000)

 

$(60,000)

Common stock issued for services

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

6,050,000

 

 

 

61

 

 

 

301,939

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

302,000

 

Sale of common stock

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

800,000

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

89,992

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

90,000

 

Common stock issued to acquire license

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

10,000,000

 

 

 

100

 

 

 

1,549,900

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,550,000

 

Common stock issued at acquire available for sale securities

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

10,000,000

 

 

 

100

 

 

 

1,999,900

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

2,000,000

 

Fair value of warrants issued for services

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

98,000

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

98,000

 

Contributed capital

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

78,000

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

78,000

 

Unrealized loss on change in fair value of available for sale securities

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(400,000)

 

 

-

 

 

 

(400,000)

Net loss

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(525,000)

 

 

(525,000)

Balance, September 30, 2014

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

71,656,000

 

 

 

717

 

 

 

10,003,283

 

 

 

(400,000)

 

 

(6,471,000)

 

 

3,133,000

 

Effect of reverse merger:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares yet to be surrendered in recapitalization

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(3,557,777)

 

 

(36)

 

 

36

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock issued in connection with share exchange transaction

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

6,467,000

 

 

 

65

 

 

 

(70,068)

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(70,003)

Fair value of warrants in connection with recapitalization

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

641,126

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

641,126

 

Sale of common stock

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

2,781,668

 

 

 

28

 

 

 

339,972

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

340,000

 

Common stock issued for services

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,715,500

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

115,054

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

115,070

 

Common stock issued in exchange with exercise of warrants

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

7,000,000

 

 

 

70

 

 

 

630

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

700

 

Common stock issued in exchange with exercise of options

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

6,000,000

 

 

 

60

 

 

 

540

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

600

 

Common stock issued in exchange with exercise of options on a cashless basis

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

3,882,352

 

 

 

39

 

 

 

(39)

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Reclassification of unrealized loss upon impairment of available for sale security

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

400,000

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

400,000

 

Net loss

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(3,343,078)

 

 

(3,343,078)

Balance, September 30, 2015

 

 

-

 

 

$-

 

 

 

95,944,743

 

 

 

959

 

 

$11,030,534

 

 

$-

 

 

$(9,814,078)

 

$1,217,415

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 
F-6
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

 

 

Year Ended September 30

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$(3,343,078)

 

$(525,000)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Merger costs

 

 

641,126

 

 

 

-

 

Stock based compensation

 

 

115,068

 

 

 

302,000

 

Warrant Expense

 

 

-

 

 

 

98,000

 

Impairment on available for sale securities

 

 

2,000,000

 

 

 

-

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepaid expenses

 

 

(42)

 

 

-

 

Accounts payable

 

 

(24,403)

 

 

(2,000)

Accrued payroll and benefits

 

 

320,000

 

 

 

-

 

Due to related party

 

 

89,717

 

 

 

-

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

 

(201,612)

 

 

(127,000)
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH USED IN INVESTING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

License costs

 

 

(102,053)

 

 

-

 

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(102,053)

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from the sale of common shares, net

 

 

340,000

 

 

 

90,000

 

Proceeds from warrant and option exercises

 

 

1,300

 

 

 

-

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

341,300

 

 

 

90,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NET CHANGE IN CASH

 

 

37,635

 

 

 

(37,000)

CASH AT BEGINNING OF PERIOD

 

 

6,000

 

 

 

43,000

 

CASH AT END OF PERIOD

 

$43,635

 

 

$6,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash paid during the period for:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest

 

$-

 

 

$-

 

Income taxes

 

$-

 

 

$-

 

Non-cash investing and financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net liabilities assumed in connection with recapitalization

 

$70,003

 

 

$-

 

Effect of recapitalization

 

$71,384

 

 

$-

 

Capital Contributed by Arrayit Corporation

 

$-

 

 

$78,000

 

Common stock for available-for-sale securities

 

$-

 

 

$2,000,000

 

Common stock for license

 

$-

 

 

$1,550,000

 

Unrealized loss on available-for-sale securities

 

$-

 

 

$400,000

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 
F-7
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
SEPTEMBER 30, 2015 AND 2014

 

NOTE 1 – NATURE OF OPERATIONS AND BASIS OF PRESENTATION

 

Avant Diagnostics, Inc. ("Avant", "we" or the "Company"), a Nevada corporation established in 2009, is a diagnostic company that focuses on the commercialization of a series of proprietary microarray-based diagnostic tests that provide early detection of cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, and other chronic and severe disease states. Avant was originally named Arrayit Diagnostics, Inc. which was formed as a majority owned subsidiary of Arrayit Corporation ("Arrayit") through a technology transfer in July 2009. In January 2013, the Company effected a name change to Avant Diagnostics, Inc.

 

The Company's premier product is OvaDxÒ, a noninvasive proteomics diagnostic screening test for the early detection of ovarian cancer. The Company believes this test will be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") as the first pre-symptomatic screening test for ovarian cancer in the United States, detecting all types and all stages of ovarian cancer with high sensitivity and specificity. The Company's primary activities since inception has been focused preparing sample specimens in order for OvaDx to obtain FDA approval. The Company has not generated revenues since inception.

 

Basis of Presentation

 

Effective December 29, 2014, we completed a reverse recapitalization, as agreed in the definitive Agreement and Plan of Reorganization, of 100% of the outstanding equity interests of American Liberty Petroleum Corp. ("ALP"). Avant shareholders received approximately 74,500,000 hares of common stock for a 93% equity interest in ALP. Such share exchange was calculated based on a one-for-one conversion ratio after a 1 for 17 reverse stock split of ALP which was subsequently effected in March 2015. The split affected the ALP common stock and not the Avant common stock. All references in these consolidated financial statements to the number of shares, options and other common stock equivalents, price per share and weighted-average number of shares outstanding of common stock have been adjusted to retroactively reflect the effect of the stock split. Per the terms of the Agreement and Plan of Reorganization, ALP was delivered with zero assets and $70,000 in liabilities at time of closing. Following the reverse merger, we changed the name of ALP to "Avant Diagnostics, Inc." The transaction was regarded as a reverse recapitalization whereby Avant was considered to be the accounting acquirer as it retained control of ALP after the exchange. Although ALP is the legal parent company, the share exchange was treated as a recapitalization of ALP. Avant is the continuing entity for financial reporting purposes. Accordingly, the assets and liabilities and the historical operations reflected in the financial statements are those of Avant for all periods presented.

 

In conjunction with the reverse recapitalization, Issuers Capital Advisors, LLC, an entity controlled by the Company's President and CEO, was granted 5,000,000 warrants with a fair value of $641,126. The cost of the warrants are recognized on the Consolidated Statement of Operations as Merger costs. (See Note 7)

 

As of September 30, 2015, there remained a total 3,557,777 shares of common stock that still had not been converted by Avant shareholders as part of the reverse recapitalization. The Agreement and Plan of Reorganization does not provide for cash in lieu of exchange of shares and provides that upon the merger, the shareholders acquired their rights in ALP shares and all outstanding shares of Avant were deemed to be cancelled. There is no timeframe as to when the shareholders must convert their shares and, as of the date of this report, the shares have not been issued.

 

On January 27, 2015, the Company effected a change in the par value of its common stock to $0.00001 per share. Accordingly, the Company has recorded a retroactive reclassification to reflect the change in par value on its consolidated balance sheets for all periods presented.

 

 
F-8
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
SEPTEMBER 30, 2015 AND 2014

 

NOTE 2 – GOING CONCERN AND MANAGEMENT'S LIQUIDITY PLANS

 

Since inception, the Company has financed its operations primarily through equity financings and advances from related parties. As of September 30, 2015, the Company had an accumulated deficit of $9,814,078. During years ended September 30, 2015 and 2014, the Company incurred net losses of $3,343,078 and $525,000, respectively, and used cash in operating activities of $201,612 and $127,000, respectively. These conditions raise substantial doubt about the Company's ability to continue as a going concern.

 

Subsequent to September 30, 2015, the Company continues to incur net losses from operating activities. Currently, the Company raised $225,000 from private placement offerings during December 2015 and January 2016. See Note 11.

 

The Company recognizes it will need to raise additional capital in order to fund operations, meet its payment obligations and execute its business plan. There is no assurance that additional financing will be available when needed or that management will be able to obtain financing on terms acceptable to the Company and whether the Company will generate revenues, become profitable and generate positive operating cash flow. If the Company is unable to raise sufficient additional funds on favorable terms, it will have to develop and implement a plan to further extend payables and to raise capital through the issuance of debt or equity on less favorable terms until sufficient additional capital is raised to support further operations. There can be no assurance that such a plan will be successful. If the Company is unable to obtain financing on a timely basis, the Company could be forced to sell its assets, discontinue its operations and/or pursue other strategic avenues to commercialize its technology, and its intellectual property could be impaired.

 

Accordingly, the accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America ("U.S. GAAP"), which contemplates continuation of the Company as a going concern and the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. The carrying amounts of assets and liabilities presented in the consolidated financial statements do not necessarily represent realizable or settlement values. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

NOTE 3 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiary, ALP. All intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of expenses during the reporting period. The Company's significant estimates include useful lives of long-lived assets, the valuation of equity instruments and the valuation allowance relating to the Company's deferred tax assets, Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

 
F-9
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
SEPTEMBER 30, 2015 AND 2014

 

Reclassifications

 

Certain accounts in the prior period consolidated financial statements have been reclassified for comparison purposes to conform to the presentation of the current period consolidated financial statements. These reclassifications had no effect on the previously reported net loss. Specifically, the September 30, 2014 stockholders' equity has been adjusted for the effects of the recapitalization. See Note 1.

 

Cash

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less when purchased to be cash equivalents. As of September 30, 2015, the Company does not have any cash equivalents.

 

Marketable securities

 

The Company's investments consist of available for sale securities. The Company's investments are carried at fair value with unrealized gains and losses reported in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) in stockholders' equity. The fair values of securities were based on quoted market prices.

 

Net Loss per Share of Common Stock

 

The Company computes basic net loss per share by dividing net loss per share available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period, adjusted to give effect to the 17-for-1 reverse stock split, which was effective in the market in March 2015 (see Note 1), and excludes the effects of any potentially dilutive securities. Diluted earnings per share, if presented, would include the dilution that would occur upon the exercise or conversion of all potentially dilutive securities into common stock using the "treasury stock" and/or "if converted" methods as applicable. The computation of basic and diluted loss per share for the year ended September 30, 2014 excludes potentially dilutive securities when their inclusion would be anti-dilutive, or if their exercise prices were greater than the average market price of the common stock during the period. As of September 30, 2015, the Company had no options, warrants, preferred stock or other potentially dilutive securities outstanding.

 

Potentially dilutive securities excluded from the computation of basic and diluted net loss per share are as follows:

 

 

 

September 30,

2015

 

 

September 30,

2014

 

Options to purchase common stock

 

 

-

 

 

 

10,000,000

 

Warrants to purchase common stock

 

 

-

 

 

 

2,000,000

 

Total

 

 

-

 

 

 

12,000,000

 

 

Intangible Assets

 

The Company's intangible assets consist of intellectual property for the technology transfer agreement and licensing payments for use of various patent for its worldwide exclusive licensed rights to OvaDx.

 

Intangible assets with finite lives are amortized over their estimated useful lives. Intangible assets with indefinite lives are not amortized, but are tested for impairment annually. The Company's intangible asset with a finite life is the patent cost, which are to be amortized over their economic or legal life, whichever is shorter. To date, these patent costs are due to legal, filing issuance and maintenance fees associated with the patents and amortization has been de minimus.

 

 
F-10
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
SEPTEMBER 30, 2015 AND 2014

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

The Company reviews the carrying value of intangibles and other long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Recoverability of long-lived assets is measured by comparing the carrying amount of the asset or asset group to the undiscounted cash flows that the asset or asset group is expected to generate. If the undiscounted cash flows of such assets are less than the carrying amount, the impairment to be recognized is measured by the amount by which the carrying amount of the property, if any, exceeds its fair market value. During the year ended September 30, 2015 and 2014, the Company management performed an evaluation of its acquired intangible assets as of September 30, 2015 and 2014 and no impairment was deemed to exist as of September 30, 2015 and 2014. Considerable management judgment is necessary to estimate the fair value. Accordingly, actual results could vary significantly from management's estimates.

 

Concentrations of Credit Risk

 

The Company maintains deposits in a financial institution which is insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation ("FDIC"). At various times, the Company has deposits in this financial institution in excess of the amount insured by the FDIC.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

Fair value estimates discussed herein are based upon certain market assumptions and pertinent information available to management as of September 30, 2015 and 2014. The respective carrying value of certain on-balance-sheet financial instruments approximated their fair values. These financial instruments include cash and accounts payable. Fair values were assumed to approximate carrying values for cash and payables because they are short term in nature and their carrying amounts approximate fair values or they are payable on demand.

 

Research and Development

 

The Company accounts for research and development costs in accordance with the Accounting Standards Codification subtopic ("ASC") 730-10, Research and Development ("ASC 730-10"). Under ASC 730-10, all research and development costs must be charged to expense as incurred. Accordingly, internal research and development costs are expensed as incurred. Third-party research and developments costs are expensed when the contracted work has been performed or as milestone results have been achieved. Company-sponsored research and development costs related to both present and future products are expensed in the period incurred. For the years ended September 30, 2015 and 2014, the Company's expenditures on research and product development were $25,000 and $0 respectively.

 

Website Development Costs

 

The Company recognizes website development costs in accordance with ASC subtopic 350-50, Website Development Costs ("ASC 350-50"). As such, the Company expenses all costs incurred that relate to the planning and post implementation phases of development of its website. Direct costs incurred in the development phase are capitalized and recognized over the estimated useful life. Costs associated with repair or maintenance for the website were expensed in the period incurred. During the years ended September 30, 2015 and 2014, the Company did not capitalize any costs associated with the website development.

 

 
F-11
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
SEPTEMBER 30, 2015 AND 2014

 

Comprehensive Income (Loss)

 

The Company adopted ASC subtopic 220-10, Comprehensive Income ("ASC 220-10") which establishes standards for the reporting and displaying of comprehensive income and its components. Comprehensive income is defined as the change in equity of a business during a period from transactions and other events and circumstances from non-owners sources. It includes all changes in equity during a period except those resulting from investments by owners and distributions to owners. ASC 220-10 requires other comprehensive income (loss) to include unrealized gains and losses on available for sale securities adjustments.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company recognizes deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of items that have been included or excluded in the financial statements or tax returns. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined on the basis of the difference between the tax basis of assets and liabilities and their respective financial reporting amounts ("temporary differences") at enacted tax rates in effect for the years in which the temporary differences are expected to reverse.

 

The Company adopted the provisions of ASC Topic 740-10, which prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement process for financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return.

 

Management has evaluated and concluded that there were no material uncertain tax positions requiring recognition in the Company's consolidated financial statements as of September 30, 2015 and 2014. The Company does not expect any significant changes in its unrecognized tax benefits within twelve months of the reporting date.

 

The Company classifies interest expense and any related penalties related to income tax uncertainties as a component of income tax expense. No interest or penalties have been recognized as of September 30, 2015 and 2014.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company measures the cost of services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the fair value of the award. For employees and directors, the fair value of the award is measured on the grant date and for non-employees, the fair value of the award is generally re-measured on vesting dates and interim financial reporting dates until the service period is complete. The fair value amount is then recognized over the period during which services are required to be provided in exchange for the award, usually the vesting period. Stock-based compensation expense is recorded by the Company in the same expense classifications in the consolidated statements of operations, as if such amounts were paid in cash.

 

Advertising

 

The Company's advertising costs are expensed as incurred. Advertising expense was $600 and $0 for the years endedSeptember 30, 2015 and 2014.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

The Company has adopted Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2014-10, Development Stage Entities (Topic 915): Elimination of Certain Financial Reporting Requirements, Including an Amendment to Variable Interest Entities Guidance in Topic 810, Consolidation. The amendments in this ASU remove all incremental financial reporting requirements from U.S. GAAP for development stage entities, including the removal of Topic 915, Development Stage Entities, from the FASB Accounting Standards Codification™.

 

 
F-12
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
SEPTEMBER 30, 2015 AND 2014

 
A development stage entity is one that devotes substantially all of its efforts to establishing a new business and for which: (a) planned principal operations have not commenced; or (b) planned principal operations have commenced, but have produced no significant revenue. For example, many start-ups or even long-lived organizations that have not yet begun their principal operations or do not have significant revenue would be identified as development stage entities.

 

For public business entities, the presentation and disclosure requirements in Topic 915 will no longer be required for the first annual period beginning after December 15, 2014. The revised consolidation standards are effective one year later, in annual periods beginning after December 15, 2015. Early adoption is permitted.
  

The Company has chosen to adopt the provisions of the ASU, hence all of the past development stage disclosures and presentations have been eliminated.

 

The FASB has issued ASU No. 2014-12, Compensation  Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Accounting for Share-Based Payments When the Terms of an Award Provide That a Performance Target Could Be achieved after the Requisite Service Period. This ASU requires that a performance target that affects vesting, and that could be achieved after the requisite service period, be treated as a performance condition. As such, the performance target should not be reflected in estimating the grant date fair value of the award. This update further clarifies that compensation cost should be recognized in the period in which it becomes probable that the performance target will be achieved and should represent the compensation cost attributable to the period(s) for which the requisite service has already been rendered. The amendments in this ASU are effective for annual periods and interim periods within those annual periods beginning after December 15, 2015. Earlier adoption is permitted. The Company has not yet determined the effect of the adoption of this standard on the Company's consolidated financial statements.

 

In August, 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-15, Presentation of Financial Statements – Going Concern (Subtopic 205-40): Disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entities Ability to Continue as a Going Concern. The standard is intended to define management's responsibility to decide whether there is substantial doubt about an organization's ability to continue as a going concern and to provide related footnote disclosures. The standard requires management to decide whether there are conditions or events that raise substantial doubt about the entity's ability to continue as a going concern within one year after the date that the financial statements are issued. The standard provides guidance to an organization's management, with principles and definitions that are intended to reduce diversity in the timing and content of disclosures that are commonly provided by organizations in the footnotes. The standard becomes effective in the annual period ending after December 15, 2016, with early application permitted. The adoption of this pronouncement is not expected to have a material impact on the consolidated financial statements. Management's evaluations regarding the events and conditions that raise substantial doubt regarding the Company's ability to continue as a going concern have been disclosed in Note 2.

 

In April 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issued Accounting Standards Update ("ASU") No. 2015-03, "Interest -Imputation of Interest (Subtopic 835-30): Simplifying the Presentation of Debt Issuance Costs" ("ASU 2015-03"). ASU 2015-03 amends the existing guidance to require that debt issuance costs be presented in the balance sheet as a deduction from the carrying amount of the related debt liability instead of as a deferred charge. ASU 2015-03 is effective on a retrospective basis for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2015, but early adoption is permitted. The Company does not anticipate that the adoption of this standard will have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

 

There are other various updates recently issued, most of which represented technical corrections to the accounting literature or application to specific industries and are not expected to have a material impact on the Company's financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

 
F-13
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
SEPTEMBER 30, 2015 AND 2014

 

NOTE 4 – FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

 

The Company measures the fair value of financial assets and liabilities based on the guidance of ASC 820 "Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures" which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value, and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. ASC 820 defines fair value as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. ASC 820 also establishes a fair value hierarchy, which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value.

 

ASC 820 describes three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value:

 

Level 1 — quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities

 

Level 2 — quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets or inputs that are observable

 

Level 3 — inputs that are unobservable based on an entity's own assumptions, as there is little, if any, related market activity. (For example, cash flow modeling inputs based on assumptions)

 

The Company did not have any financial assets or liabilities which were required to be measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of September 30, 2015 and 2014.

 

NOTE 5 - INVESTMENT IN EQUITY SECURITIES

 

The fair values of the Company's marketable securities are based on quoted market prices and are included in the accompanying consolidated balance sheet under total current assets as available-for sale securities. The Company relied on guidance by the FASB ASC 320-10-25-1 regarding a classification of securities.

 

As of September 30, 2015, the Company's available-for-sale securities consisted of 10,000,000 shares of Arrayit.

 

(OTCB: ARYC) acquired in August 2014 in exchange for the issuance of 10,000,000 common shares of the Company. These shares were exchanged pursuant to a share exchange agreement with Arrayit in August 2014. The Company had previously determined that its investment was not classified as either trading securities or held to maturity. Furthermore, due to the liquidity profile of Arrayit shares as traded on the OTC Markets, the Company believed that it could liquidate such securities at any time; therefore these securities were classified as available-for-sale securities. These securities were recorded at fair market value with changes in value classified in the financial statements as unrealized gain/loss in other comprehensive income.

 

Other than Temporary Decline in Available-for-Sale Securities

 

In August 2015, new information came to the attention of Company management regarding its investment in Arrayit. The Arrayit shares went into a precipitous decline and had a de minims market value. Management of the Company believes that such decline was not due to an underlying condition of the Arrayit operations or business strategy and determined that such decline was probably not temporary due to the uncertainty of recovery of Arrayit's share price in the short and long term. In reaching our conclusion, we relied on accounting guidance presented in ASC 320-10-35 regarding a subsequent measurement of available for sale securities and impairment and the temporary factors related thereto. Specifically, while the guidance could point to a decline that was temporary, management determined that the impact to the Arrayit shares had a minimal chance of recovery.

 

 
F-14
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
SEPTEMBER 30, 2015 AND 2014

 

The Company determined that its investment in available-for-sale securities had an other than temporary decline in value and chose to fully impair the value in our consolidated balance sheet as of September 30, 2015. The Company recorded a realized loss in the amount of $2,000,000 for the year ended September 30, 2015.

 

Total loss from other-than-temporary impairment

 

$2,000,000

 

Portion of loss previously recognized in other comprehensive income

 

 

(400,000)

Net impairment losses in the year ended September 30, 2015

 

$1,600,000

 

 

As of September 30, 2015, Arrayit is a significant stockholder of the Company. See Note 6.

 

NOTE 6 – LICENSE AND TECHNOLOGY AGREEMENTS

 

The Company's intangible assets consist of technology enhancements and licensing payments for its worldwide exclusive licensed rights to OvaDxÒ, a noninvasive proteomics diagnostic screening test for the early detection of ovarian cancer.

 

Technology Assignment Agreement with Arrayit Corporation

 

On July 18, 2009, the Company entered into a Technology Assignment Agreement with Arrayit (the "Tech Transfer Agreement"), whereby Arrayit assigned to the Company, exclusively throughout the world, all right, title and interest in the technology behind the microarray-based test for the detection and monitoring of ovarian cancer (the "Intellectual Property). The consideration under the Tech Transfer Agreement for the Intellectual Property was 80% of the Company's issued and outstanding shares of capital stock existing at the time of the agreement, or 19,350,000 shares of common stock. The term of the agreement is indefinite.

 

Licensing Agreement with Wayne State University

 

On December 7, 2009, the Company entered into a worldwide licensing agreement and sponsored research agreement with Arrayit and Wayne State University ("WSU") in Detroit, Michigan, for the continued research and development of a protein microarray-based diagnostic test for the early detection of ovarian cancer. WSU's research involving ovarian cancer has been focused on the specific expression of genes associated with ovarian cancer (the "License Agreement"). WSU has used Arrayit's microarray technology to help identify key biomarkers using a process that has allowed them to isolate biomarkers unique to ovarian cancer. As a result, Arrayit has been able to build on this approach and is now in the late stage development phase of a simple blood test for the early detection of ovarian cancer that uses approximately 100 unique proteomic biomarkers in a microarray-based serologic detection of ovarian cancer markers that accumulate in the bloodstream as a result of the body's natural immune response to developing ovarian tumors. WSU shall have the right to terminate the agreement if it reasonably determines that the Company is not diligently utilizing the licensed patents or the license agreement will expire as the patents expire.

 

Under the terms of the License Agreement, the Company is obligated to make a one-time payment of $125,000 to WSU within 30 days after the approval of the first licensed product by the FDA or another comparable agency, and is obligated to make royalty payments of up to 5% of the net revenues of the licensed products on a quarterly basis, or minimum royalty payments as set forth below under the First Amendment.

 

 
F-15
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
SEPTEMBER 30, 2015 AND 2014

 

On March 1, 2014, the Company and WSU entered into an amendment to the License Agreement in order to reflect the new name of the Company and to amend certain provisions (the "First Amendment") as follows:

 

 

·

Update the list of licensed patents;

 

 

 

 

·

Waive and update certain diligence milestones;

 

 

 

 

·

Establish a payment schedule for certain past due patent costs due to WSU by the Company;

 

 

 

 

·

Establish a payment schedule for certain accrued patent expenses incurred by WSU totaling $118,586;

 

 

 

 

·

Require the Company to pay ongoing patent expenses;

 

 

 

 

·

Waive the minimum royalty of $50,000 for each of 2011, 2012 and 2013 and adjust minimum annual royalties to $25,000 for 2014 and 2015, $50,000 for 2016 and 2017, $150,000 for 2018 and 2019 and $300,000 for 2020 and each year thereafter;

 

 

 

 

·

Amend the list of material obligations;

 

 

 

 

·

Waive certain interest and late fees; and

 

 

 

 

·

Update addresses of record for both WSU and the Company.

  

As of September 30, 2015, the carrying value of the rights to OvaDxÒ and payments to WSU under the License Agreement was $1,651,875, consisting of enhancements to the original initial rights licensed assigned to the Company resulting from the Tech Transfer Agreement with Arrayit as well as licensing payments made to WSU. The Company paid for these enhancements by the issuance of 10,000,000 common shares to Arrayit in August 2014, as well as cash payments to WSU. In 2015, the Company paid its clinical research organization $102,000 in conjunction with the commencement of the OvaDx to FDA trials. The Company will periodically assess the intellectual property status for changes in the valuation. The Company is not amortizing the value of the license. Upon FDA approval, the Company will be amortizing the license over the remaining term of the patent. As of September 30, 2015, the Company has commenced FDA approval process. As of September 30, 2015, the Company has not obtained final FDA approval and the asset has not been placed in service.

 

Exclusive Services Agreement between Arrayit Corporation and the Company

 

On September 10, 2009, the Company entered into an Exclusive Services Agreement with Arrayit (the "Services Agreement"), whereby the Company will utilize the services of Arrayit to manufacture and provide the Company with a commercial supply of a microarray-based test for the detection and monitoring of ovarian cancer. The term of the Services Agreement was for five (5) years, with election to extend by the Company for an additional five (5) year period. Thereafter, the Services Agreement shall renew automatically for successive two-year periods, unless either Arrayit or the Company notifies the other of its election not to renew at least twelve (12) months prior to the expiration of the term. The term has been extended through September 2019. On August 6, 2014, the Company and Arrayit agreed that, upon any sales of OvaDxÒ and if desired by the purchaser, that Arrayit would agree to include the manufacturing rights in the sale for no additional consideration.

 

NOTE 7 – STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY

 

Preferred Stock

 

Effective January 27, 2015, the Company adopted an amendment to the articles of incorporation to authorize the issuance of preferred stock with preferences, limitations, and relative rights designated by our board of directors (the "Preferred Shares"). The amendment to our articles of incorporation will authorize the issuance of up to 50 million Preferred Shares, with different series under the discretion of our board of directors, without any action on the part of the stockholders. As of September 30, 2015 and 2014, no Preferred Shares are issued or outstanding.

 

As discussed in Note 1, on December 29, 2014, the Company completed a merger with ALP. Upon consummation of the merger, the Series B Preferred Stock outstanding was retired whereby Arrayit became the majority shareholder. In connection with the merger, the Company's Chief Executive Officer entered into a voting agreement with Arrayit which granted the Company's Chief Executive Officer unilateral voting authority over Arrayit's shares through December 2015. The Company's Chief Executive Officer is currently in the process of negotiating a renewal with Arrayit.

 

 
F-16
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
SEPTEMBER 30, 2015 AND 2014

 

Common Stock

 

On January 27, 2015, the Company filed an amendment to its Articles of Incorporation and effected a 17-for-1 reverse stock split of its issued and outstanding shares of common stock, whereby 109,939,000 outstanding shares of the Company's common stock were converted into 6,467,000 shares of the Company's common stock. The reverse stock split was effective in the market commencing on January 27, 2015. All per share amounts and number of shares in the consolidated financial statements, related notes and other items throughout have been retroactively restated to reflect the reverse stock split.

 

During the year ended September 30, 2014, the Company issued an aggregate of 6,050,000 shares of our common stock for consulting services valued at $302,000.

 

During the year ended September 30, 2014, the Company sold 800,000 shares of our common stock to certain investors for a total of $90,000.

 

During the year ended September 30, 2014, the Company issued 10,000,000 shares of our common stock for intellectual property valued at $1,550,000.

 

During the year ended September 30, 2014, the Company issued 10,000,000 shares of our common in exchange for 10,000,000 shares of Arrayit Corporation common stock valued at $2,000,000.

 

The board of directors authorized the following issuances of stock for services. The Company evaluated in accordance with ASC 505-50 "Equity-Based Payments to Non-Employees":

 

During the three months ended December 31, 2014 the Company sold 2,781,666 shares of our common stock to certain investors for net proceeds of $340,000 inclusive of an aggregate of 15,000 shares of our common stock as a finder's fee.

 

On April 22, 2015, the Company issued an aggregate of 87,500 restricted shares of our common stock for as consideration for consulting services. During the year ended September 30, 2015, the Company expensed $7,125 relating to these services.

 

On April 22, 2015, the Company issued an aggregate of 18,000 restricted shares of our common stock for as consideration for legal services. During the year ended September 30, 2015, the Company expensed $2,700 relating to these services.

 

On April 22, 2015, the Company issued an aggregate of 100,000 restricted shares of our common stock to the two independent directors of the Company for their Board of Directors services. During the year ended September 30, 2015, the Company expensed $7,500 relating to these services.

 

On September 15, 2015, the Company issued an aggregate of 1,200,000 restricted shares of our common stock for investor relations services valued at $180,000. These shares vest over a one-year service period. During the year ended September 30, 2015, the Company expensed $90,000 relating to these services.

 

On September 15, 2015, the Company issued an aggregate of 250,000 restricted shares of our common stock for 6 months of social media and investor relations services valued at $37,500. These shares vest over a 6 month period. The services start in October 2015, accordingly during the year ended September 30, 2015, the Company did not record an expense.

 

On September 15, 2015, the Company issued an aggregate of 60,000 restricted shares of our common stock for legal services valued at $9,000. These shares vest over a six month service period. During the year ended September 30, 2015, the Company expensed $4,500 relating to these services.

 

 
F-17
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
SEPTEMBER 30, 2015 AND 2014

 

Stock Options and Warrants

 

Warrants

 

On March 10, 2015, in conjunction with the reverse recapitalization discussed in Note 1, Issuers Capital Advisors, LLC, an entity controlled by the Company's President and CEO, was granted 5,000,000 warrants with immediate vesting, a term of 5 years and an exercise price of $0.0001. These warrants were evaluated in accordance with ASC 718-20 "Stock compensation-award" since an officer and director controls the entity and were classified as equity. In March 2015, these warrants were exercised for cash proceeds of $500. The Company recorded the $641,126 fair value of these warrants as a cost of the merger. The fair value of the warrants on the issuance date was $0.128 per share, using recent sales to unaffiliated investors. The Company evaluated its past trading history and concluded that it is a thinly traded stock and that past cash sales to unaffiliated investors was the best measure of fair value. The Company determined the fair value of these warrants using the following (level 3 inputs):

 

Stock price

 

$0.128

 

Term (years)

 

 

2.5

 

Volatility

 

 

145%

Risk-free interest rate

 

 

1.62%

Exercise price

 

$0.0001

 

Dividend yield

 

 

0.00%

 

On March 31, 2015, Issuer Capital Advisors, LLC, exercised 2,000,000 warrants with an exercise price of $0.0001 for cash proceeds of $200.

 

The following table reflects a summary of common stock warrants outstanding and warrant activity during the periods:

 

 

 

Number of

Warrants

 

 

Weighted

Average

Exercise

Price

 

 

Weighted

Average

Term

(Years)

 

 

Aggregate

Intrinsic

Value

 

Warrants outstanding at September 30, 2013

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Granted

 

 

2,000,000

 

 

 

0.0001

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

-

 

Exercised

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Forfeited

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Warrants outstanding at September 30, 2014

 

 

2,000,000

 

 

$0.0001

 

 

 

4.9

 

 

$-

 

Granted

 

 

5,000,000

 

 

 

0.0001

 

 

 

5.0

 

 

 

-

 

Exercised

 

 

(7,000,000)

 

 

0.0001

 

 

 

4.9

 

 

 

-

 

Forfeited

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Warrants outstanding and exercisable at September 30, 2015

 

 

-

 

 

$-

 

 

 

-

 

 

$-

 

 

The Company classifies as equity any contracts that (i) require physical settlement or net-share settlement or (ii) provide the Company with a choice of net-cash settlement or settlement in its own shares (physical settlement or net-share settlement) providing that such contracts are indexed to the Company's own stock. The Company classifies as assets or liabilities any contracts that (i) require net-cash settlement (including a requirement to net cash settle the contract if an event occurs and if that event is outside the Company's control) or (ii) gives the counterparty a choice of net-cash settlement or settlement in shares (physical settlement or net-share settlement). The Company assesses classification of its common stock purchase warrants and other free standing derivatives at each reporting date to determine whether a change in classification between equity and liabilities is required.

 

Stock Options

 

On March 31, 2015, options for a total 4,000,000 were exercised at $0.0001 per a cashless exercise into 3,882,352 shares of our common stock. On March 31, 2015, 6,000,000 options of our common stock were exercised for total proceeds of $600. Both of these options were exercised by Gregg Linn, the Company's Chief Executive Officer and President and Steven Scott, a former officer of the Company.

 

Option valuation models require the input of highly subjective assumptions. The fair value of stock-based payment awards was estimated using the Black-Scholes option model with a volatility figure derived from an index of historical stock prices of comparable entities until sufficient data exists to estimate the volatility using the Company's own historical stock prices. Management determined this assumption to be a more accurate indicator of value. The Company accounts for the expected life of options based on the contractual life of options for non-employees. For employees, the Company accounts for the expected life of options in accordance with the "simplified" method, which is used for "plain-vanilla" options, as defined in the ASC.

 

 
F-18
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
SEPTEMBER 30, 2015 AND 2014

 

The risk-free interest rate was determined from the implied yields of U.S. Treasury zero-coupon bonds with a remaining life consistent with the expected term of the options. The fair value of stock-based payment awards during the years ended September 30, 2015 and 2014 was estimated using the Black-Scholes pricing model. The dividend rate is zero because the Company does not anticipate issuing dividends.

 

In addition, the Company is required to estimate the expected forfeiture rate and only recognize expense for those shares expected to vest. In estimating the Company's forfeiture rate, the Company analyzed its historical forfeiture rate, the remaining lives of unvested options, and the number of vested options as a percentage of total options outstanding. If the Company's actual forfeiture rate is materially different from its estimate, or if the Company reevaluates the forfeiture rate in the future, the stock-based compensation expense could be significantly different from what the Company has recorded in the current period.

 

The Company estimated forfeitures related to option grants at a weighted average annual rate of 0% per year, as the Company does not yet have adequate historical data, for options granted during the years September 30, 2015 and 2014.

 

Stock option activity summary covering options is presented in the table below:

 

 

 

Number of

Options

 

 

Weighted

Average

Exercise

Price

 

 

Weighted

Average

Term

(Years)

 

 

Aggregate

Intrinsic

Value

 

Options outstanding at September 30, 2013

 

 

10,000,000

 

 

$0.02

 

 

 

7.2

 

 

$-

 

Granted

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Exercised

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Forfeited

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Options outstanding at September 30, 2014

 

 

10,000,000

 

 

 

0.02

 

 

 

6.2

 

 

 

-

 

Granted

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Exercised

 

 

(9,882,352)

 

 

(0.02)

 

 

5.8

 

 

 

-

 

Forfeited

 

 

(117,648)

 

 

(0.05)

 

 

2.7

 

 

 

-

 

Options outstanding and exercisable at September 30, 2015

 

 

-

 

 

$-

 

 

 

-

 

 

$-

 

 

NOTE 8 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

Legal

 

In the normal course of business, the Company may be involved in legal proceedings, claims and assessments arising in the ordinary course of business. Such matters are subject to many uncertainties, and outcomes are not predictable with assurance. There are no such matters that are deemed material to the consolidated nancial statements as of September 30, 2015, except as discussed below.

 

On January 13, 2014, Plaintiff Tamarin Lindenberg sued Arrayit, the Company, John Howell, Steven Scott and Gregg Linn in Civil Action No. L7698-13. Plaintiff alleged violations of the New Jersey Conscientious Employee Protection Act NJSA 34:19-1 to NJSA 34:19-8 ("CEPA"), breach of contract, breach of covenant of good faith and fair dealing, economic duress and intentional infliction of emotional distress. On August 6, 2014, the District Court dismissed Plaintiff's complaint against Arrayit for failure to state a claim upon which relief may be granted and against John Howell for lack of jurisdiction. The Company and its officers remain as defendants in the action. The Company and its officers have mounted a vigorous defense against these claims and believe they are without legal merit.

 

 
F-19
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
SEPTEMBER 30, 2015 AND 2014

 

Employment Agreements

 

On October 1, 2014, we entered into an employment agreement with Gregg Linn, our Chief Executive Officer. The employment agreement provide that Mr. Linn will receive an annual base salary of $240,000 per year. In addition, Mr. Linn is entitled to monthly car allowance of $1,500 and the Company has agreed to pay to Mr. Linn the greater of 100% of all health care premiums of $3,000 per month.

 

Mr. Linn is entitled to participate in any and all benefit plans, from time to time, in effect for senior management, along with vacation, sick and holiday pay in accordance with the Company's policies established and in effect from time to time. The employment agreement provides for termination of Mr. Linn's employment without any further obligation on our part upon the death or disability of the executive or for cause. In the event that an executive's employment is terminated for good reason, we are obligated to pay Mr. Linn his base salary for a twelve month period beginning on the date of termination and any pro-rated potion of any bonus payable to Mr. Linn, which shall be assumed to be 30% of his base compensation unless otherwise provided for by the board of directors.

 

The employment agreements also contain covenants (a) restricting the executive from engaging in any activity competitive with our business during the term of the employment agreement and in the event of termination for cause or without good reason, for a period of eighteen months thereafter, (b) prohibiting the executive from disclosing confidential information regarding us, and (c) soliciting our employees, customers and prospective customers during the term of the employment agreement and for a period of eighteen months thereafter.

 

NOTE 9 – RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

As of December 31, 2014, the Company leases corporate office space under a month-to-month operating lease of $200 per month from an entity Controlled by the Company's Chief Executive Officer. For the years ended September 30, 2015 and 2014, total rent expense was $2,400 and $1,800, respectively.

 

The Company had accrued expenses due to current and former officers, consisting mainly of salary. For the year ended September 30, 2015 and 2014, accrued expenses due to officers was $141,717 and $52,000. 

 

NOTE 10 – INCOME TAXES

 

The tax effects of temporary differences that give rise to deferred tax assets are presented below:

 

 

 

For The Years Ended September 30,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Deferred Tax Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net operating loss carryforward

 

$799,560

 

 

$234,000

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,371,000

 

Marketable Securities

 

 

788,000

 

 

 

-

 

Total deferred tax assets

 

 

1,587,560

 

 

 

1,605,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Valuation allowance

 

 

(1,587,560)

 

 

(1,605,000)
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deferred tax asset, net of valuation allowance

 

$-

 

 

$-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in valuation allowance

 

$(17,440

 

$150,000

 

 

 
F-20
 

 

AVANT DIAGNOSTICS, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
SEPTEMBER 30, 2015 AND 2014

 

The income tax provision (benefit) consists of the following:

 

 

 

For The Years Ended September 30,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Federal:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current

 

$-

 

 

$-

 

Deferred

 

 

15,049

 

 

(150,000)
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

State and local:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Deferred

 

 

2,391

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

17,440

 

 

(150,000)

Change in valuation allowance

 

 

(17,440

)

 

 

150,000

 

Income tax provision (benefit)

 

$-

 

 

$-

 

 

A reconciliation of the statutory federal income tax rate to the Company's effective tax rate is as follows:

 

 

 

For The Years Ended September 30,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tax benefit at federal statutory rate

 

 

(34.0)%

 

 

(34.0)%

State tax, net of federal benefit

 

 

(1.04)%

 

 

-%

Permanent differences

 

 

0.02%

 

 

-%

True up of deferred tax asset

 

 

 34.49

 

 

 -

%

Change in valuation allowance

 

 

0.53%

 

 

34.0%

Effective income tax rate

 

 

0%

 

 

0%
 

The Company assesses the likelihood that deferred tax assets will be realized. To the extent that realization is not likely, a valuation allowance is established. Based upon the Company's history of losses since inception, management believes that it is more likely than not that future benefits of deferred tax assets will not be realized.

 

At September 30, 2015 and 2014, the Company had $2,029,517 and $688,000, respectively, of both federal and state net operating losses that may be available to offset future taxable income. The net operating loss carry forwards, if not utilized, will expire 20 years from the filing of the Company's federal returns. In accordance with Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code, the usage of the Company's net operating loss carry forwards are subject to annual limitations in the event of a greater than 50% ownership change.

 

The Company anticipates filing income tax returns in the U.S. federal and Arizona jurisdictions and such returns will be subject to examination by taxing authorities, when filed.

 

NOTE 11 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

Management has evaluated subsequent events or transactions occurring through the date on which the nancial statements were issued. Based upon the evaluation, the Company did not identify any recognized or non-recognized subsequent events that would have required adjustment or disclosure in the consolidated nancial statements, except as disclosed.

 

Subsequent to September 30, 2015, the Company issued 125,000 shares of common stock to a consulting firm for the company website enhancements.

 

During December 2015, the Company sold 2,240,000 shares of common stock for $112,000.

 

On January 5, 2016, the Company issued a convertible note for $112,500 in exchange for an aggregate net cash proceeds of $100,000, net of financing costs. The Convertible Note has a stated interest rate of 10% per annum until paid in full and are convertible into shares of the Company's common stock at the option of the holder at a conversion price of $0.35 per share with certain anti-dilutive provisions. As of the filing date, the convertible note has not been funded.

 

 

F-21